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View Full Version : Greening The Desert - Flash Player Of Turning "Dead Sea" Desert Into Green Oasis


truebeliever
08-25-2005, 06:09 AM
In a few short years this stony desert was turned into a beautiful green oasis using permaculture techniques. This is the lowest place on the Earth 2 km from the Dead Sea in Jordan. Costs were minimal with some simple earthworks the most expensive item.

http://photos.permaculture.org.au/gallery/albums/userpics/normal_400%20yrs%20ago%20-%20this%20was%20forest...jpg

The powers that be will tell you it's impossible. They tell us we face certain disaster. That our "excessive" lifestyles mean "we" are destroying the planet blah, blah, blah...

http://photos.permaculture.org.au/gallery/albums/userpics/normal_area7%2Cswale8.jpg

Even without sexy technology that is suppressed, we still have simple soloutions for big problems.

http://photos.permaculture.org.au/gallery/albums/userpics/normal_farm%20view%202.jpg

We dont need a strong world government to save us. We dont need another "expert" asking for 20 million dollar grant to research the "soloutions". We just need top tell them all to get fucked and go about fixing the problems for ourselves.

http://www.permaculture.org.au/

Click on "Greening The Desert" at the top of the page.

http://www.permaculture.org.au/images/GeoffIcon.jpg

They laughed at him and said it couldn't be done.
Nothing could be grown in that salt laden dustbowl.
But Geoff Lawton had other ideas.
He travels the world teaching others how to repair trashed environments that are beyond hope of becoming productive.
In this story, Geoff talks about re-greening the deserts of Jordan. By applying the principles of permaculture, the Jordanians managed to salvage a heavily salted environment and turn it into a green oasis.
Geoff lives and teaches at his farm near The Channon, a small community not far from Lismore. Geoff boasts that despite not having a police station or church, the Channon has some of the most tolerant and friendly people in Australia.

nohope187
08-25-2005, 12:13 PM
It's a good idea that makes sense but, has little chance of catching on here. Too many people look to government for a solution. :-P

truebeliever
08-26-2005, 01:52 AM
Yes, but only because they are not aware of the alternatives.

What we see here is nothing more than a few "swales" cut into the earth to collect rainfall and the planting of a few species and buildup of compost type mounds...from this the land regenerates.

No majic, no special multi billion dollar machines.

I hope to do this on some shitty Crown Land sometime soon.

Anyone interested? Who has a few spare shekels?