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redrat11
08-01-2007, 05:52 PM
http://www.foxnews.com/

A eyewitness claims that At 6PM Central Time (Rush Hour) in Minneapolis, a magor bridge was heard to "rumble" and fall down!

BlueAngel
08-01-2007, 07:01 PM
When they want to use terrorism to frighten us, they normally report after the event who was responsible, because they knew the event was going to occur, by whom, when and where.

This from the Associated Press:

"The Homeland Security Department had received no indications Wednesday night that the collapse was an act of terrorism, department spokesman Russ Knocke said in Washington."

"We continue to monitor the situation. At this time, there's no indication of a nexus to terrorism," Knocke said."

redrat11
08-01-2007, 07:51 PM
Sorry but, I heard now over 6 people say that they heard "booms" or explosions before the collapse. And they live very close to the bridge nearby. sounds "conspiratorial" to me. :-?



Remember, TERROR is their main weapon against the people, whether there are casualties or not. FEAR is what they want, uncertainity....


I would be very interested to know what "companies" are involved in the construction of the bridge??????

BlueAngel
08-01-2007, 08:08 PM
Another "scare tactic" involving deaths on a smaller scale than New Orleans (remember there were witnesses who heard explosions near the levee) without pointing the finger at their terrorist organization; Al Qaeda.

I think the New Orleans disaster; catastrophe and Bush's refusal to intervene allowing people to die in the aftermath; although they knew people would die during if bombs were the reason for the levee breaks; was a kind of in your face, you are HELPLESS without us!

That is what I'm referring to when I say a "scare tactic" was used.

The hurricane, the levee break, if conducted by THEM, was a "large scale" operation to destroy cities, displace hundreds of "less fortunate" and rebuild to their liking.

I believe it was also a trial run at Marshall Law. Certainly BUSH allowed the City of New Orleans to go without assistance for reason.

Army Corps of Engineers; and/or a construction/engineering contract paid for by the taxpayers and awarded to one of the companies they own and operate.

Either or!

08/01/2007

redrat11
08-01-2007, 08:15 PM
I'd be willing to bet anyone that something unusual or devastating is happening else-where in the world right now. or that we are heading for HIGH-ALERT status tommorrow or tonight. Just look at the IRAQ news right now, huge explosions everywhere in the city.

BlueAngel
08-01-2007, 08:16 PM
I saw that. 50 or so killed in a bomb.

redrat11
08-01-2007, 08:18 PM
BlueAngel wrote:
I saw that. 50 or so killed in a bomb.

yeah, what a coincidence, :-? but your eyes should keep watch on IRAN right now.

http://warnewstoday.blogspot.com/index.html


I think it was Cheney who said something in August would go down in Iran..

BlueAngel
08-01-2007, 08:45 PM
From the AP:

"The Interstate 35W bridge, a major link between Minneapolis and St. Paul, was in the midst of being repaired when it collapsed."

BlueAngel
08-01-2007, 08:46 PM
I would bet that when a bridge collapses there is alot of rumbling that occurs.

redrat11
08-01-2007, 09:03 PM
Take a look at the mess left over, does that look like a normal event? HELL NO! it looks like carefully placed "explosives" brought the bridge down, you have to wonder whether the Mossad/CIA/ have something going on in Minneapolis? you know just like when they KILLED the Senator there?????

Even a structural engineer who inspected the bridge 3 years ago said that it was impossible to go down that way...you know like the WTC????


http://www.foxnews.com/


http://judicial-inc.biz/8_1_Baghdad_bomb.htm

BlueAngel
08-01-2007, 09:47 PM
"There were two lanes of traffic, bumper to bumper, at the point of the collapse. Those cars did go into the river," Minneapolis Police Lt. Amelia Huffman said. "At this point there is nothing to suggest that this was anything other than a structural collapse."

--------------------------------------------------

Granted, it's not everyday that an expansive bridge such as this one collapses.

WHEN WAS THE LAST TIME THIS OCCURED?

Convenient, how repairs were being made on it at the time of collapse.

If repairs were being made, wouldn't the structural engineers who determined it was in need of repairs have inspected the bridge to determine its' safety?

What kind of repairs? It sounds like it was in SERIOUS NEED OF MAJOR REPAIRS.

IF THIS IS THE CASE, then it should have been deemed unsafe and CLOSED!!!

IF THE PEOPLE WHO INSPECTED THIS BRIDGE, DETERMINED IT NEEDED REPAIRS AND COULD NOT ASCERTAIN THAT THIS BRIDGE WAS UNSAFE, IT DOESN'T SOUND LIKE THEY WERE QUALIFIED FOR THE JOB!!

If a bridge of this magnitude can buckle and collapse, IT MUST HAVE BEEN STRUCTURALLY UNSAFE AND IF THERE WERE REPAIRS IN PROCESS, THIS MEANS THE REPAIRS COULD HAVE BEEN THE COVER FOR BOMBS BEING PLACED WITHIN!!!

BlueAngel
08-02-2007, 07:31 AM
"There were two lanes of traffic, bumper to bumper, at the point of the collapse. Those cars did go into the river," Minneapolis Police Lt. Amelia Huffman said. "At this point there is nothing to suggest that this was anything other than a structural collapse."

----------------------------------------------

This statement sounds strange.

"Those cars did go into the river."

Why is it that a Minneapolis police Lt. can tell the press that at this point there isn't anything to suggest that it is something other than a STRUCTURAL COLLAPSE?

She knows this so soon after the collapse?

Is she a structural engineer or a police lieutenant?

I've never seen this bridge. But, seriously, a STRUCTURAL COLLAPSE???

Was it built from straw?

BlueAngel
08-02-2007, 04:52 PM
First of all, it was reported yesterday in an AP story on the internet via YAHOO headlines that the bridge was in the midst of repairs.

NOW THIS:

The White House said an inspection of the 40-year-old bridge in 2005 found problems. The Interstate 35W span rated 50 on a scale of 100 for structural stability and was classified as "structurally deficient," transportation officials said.

In 2005 they found problems. It rated 50 on a scale of 100 for structural stability and TWO YEARS LATER a continued decline in structural stability. What would it have rated two years later; almost three years later?

The designation means some portions of the bridge needed to be scheduled for repair or replacement. "It didn't mean that the bridge is unsafe," Transportation Secretary Mary Peters said.

The designation meant that some portions of the bridge needed to be scheduled for repair or replacement in 2005. It is almost 2008. There years later. How could the rating mean it wasn't unsafe. STRUCTURALLY DEFICIENT in 2005 and now it's almost three years later.

Earlier, at the White House, press secretary Tony Snow said while the inspection didn't indicate the bridge was at risk of failing, "If an inspection report identifies deficiencies, the state is responsible for taking corrective actions."

It was stated yesterday in a news story by the AP that the Governor said the bridge was in the midst of repairs.

Gov. Tim Pawlenty on Thursday ordered an immediate inspection of all bridges in the state with similar designs, but said the state was never warned that the bridge needed to be closed or immediately repaired. Another inspection was scheduled for completion in September, and state officials said it has been inspected yearly since 1993.

Now, he's saying that the state was never warned. Well, if a report was issued, who received it? The bridge was deemed 50 on a scale of 100 and was SCHEDULED for another inspection in September. I guess that doesn't matter now. What's the point in inspecting, providing a report that it is structurally deficient almost three years ago, if you're not going to repair and only continue to inspect it every year as it declines further?

"There was no call by anyone that we're aware of that said it should be immediately closed or immediately replaced," Pawlenty said. "It was more of a monitor, inspect, maintain, and potentially replace it in the future."

Maintain it? How can you maintain a bridge that is STRUCTURALLY DEFICIENT? Let it decline to the point of collapse while people are driving over it and then replace it in the future!!!! Notice he doesn't mention repair it. Just, monitor as the deficiencies worsen, inspect, and maintain.

Replace it in the future after it collapses. As it did!!

BlueAngel
08-02-2007, 07:06 PM
By H. JOSEF HEBERT and SHARON THEIMER, Associated Press Writers
1 hour, 57 minutes ago

WASHINGTON - More than 70,000 bridges across the country are rated structurally deficient like the span that collapsed in Minneapolis, and engineers estimate repairing them all would take at least a generation and cost more than $188 billion.

That works out to at least $9.4 billion a year over 20 years, according to the American Society of Civil Engineers.

The bridges carry an average of more than 300 million vehicles a day.

It is unclear how many of the spans pose actual safety risks. Federal officials alerted the states late Thursday to immediately inspect all bridges similar to the Mississippi River span that collapsed.

In a separate cost estimate, the Federal Highway Administration has said addressing the backlog of needed bridge repairs would take at least $55 billion. That was five years ago, with expectations of more deficiencies to come.

It is money that Congress, the federal government and the states have so far been unable or unwilling to spend.

"We're not doing what the engineers are saying we need to be doing," said Gregory Cohen, president of the American Highway Users Alliance, an advocacy group representing a wide range of motorists.

"Unfortunately when you consistently underinvest in roads and bridges ... this is the dangerous consequence," Cohen said of Wednesday's deadly Mississippi River bridge collapse in Minneapolis. He said engineers have estimated $75 billion a year is needed just to keep highways and bridges from further deterioration, but that only around $60 billion a year is being provided.

Last year, 75,422 of the nation's 597,562 bridges, or about 12.6 percent, were classified as "structurally deficient," including some built as recently as the early 1990s, according to the Federal Highway Administration.

The federal government provides 80 percent of the money for construction, repair and maintenance of the so-called federal-aid highway system including Interstate highways and bridges. But states set priorities and handle construction and maintenance contracts.

A bridge is typically judged structurally deficient if heavy trucks are banned from it or there are other weight restrictions, if it needs immediate work to stay open or if it is closed. In any case, such a bridge is considered in need of considerable maintenance, rehabilitation or even replacement.

Congressional leaders say the number of bridges in need of repair is too high and the funding too low.

There is crumbling infrastructure all over the country, said Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev. Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., who heads the Senate panel that controls transportation spending, said the Bush administration has threatened vetoes when Democrats try to increase such spending.

White House deputy press secretary Scott Stanzel, declined to address spending and accused the Democrats of using the bridge collapse for partisan purposes.

Democrats were not alone in calling for more bridge funding.

"People think they're saving money by not investing in infrastructure, and the result is you have catastrophes like this," said Rep. Tom Petri, R-Wis., a member of the House transportation committee.

The federal government is now providing about $40 billion a year to improve and expand the nation's highways and bridges.

The main source of revenue for roads and bridges, the federal highway trust fund, is failing to keep up with spending demand. The 18.3 cents a gallon in federal taxes hasn't changed since 1993, and the demand for more fuel-efficient vehicles could affect fuel consumption.

Funding isn't the only issue getting attention after the Minnesota collapse.

Transportation Secretary Mary Peters said in an interview with The Associated Press that she had asked her department's inspector general to evaluate the agency's overall bridge inspections.

According to the Federal Highway Administration, most bridges in the U.S. Highway Bridge Inventory 83 percent are inspected every two years. About 12 percent, those in bad shape, are inspected annually, and 5 percent, those in very good shape, every four years.

The Department of Transportation's inspector general last year criticized the Highway Administration's oversight of interstate bridges. The March 2006 report said investigators found incorrect or outdated maximum weight calculations and weight limit postings in the National Bridge Inventory and in states' bridge databases and said the problems could pose safety hazards. The Highway Administration agreed that improvements in its oversight of state bridge inspections and data were needed.

Incorrect load ratings could endanger bridges by allowing heavier vehicles to cross than should, and could affect whether a bridge is properly identified as structurally deficient in the first place, the inspector general said.

The audit didn't identify any Minnesota bridges or mention the state beyond noting that 3 percent of its bridges were structurally deficient, placing it at the low end among states. It said those bridges were crossed by an average of 30,000 to 40,000 vehicles a day, putting it 13th among the states.

An analysis of 2006 Federal Highway Administration data found that Minnesota bridges were generally in better shape than those in other states. Only about 6 percent of the state's 20,000 bridges were listed as being structurally deficient. In Oklahoma, nearly 27 percent of bridges were cited by the federal government as being structurally deficient.

In Nemaha County in southeastern Nebraska, about 58 percent of 194 bridges are structurally deficient. More than 55 percent of neighboring Pawnee County's 188 bridges are in the same shape. Of the 10 worst-off counties for bridges, seven are in Oklahoma or Nebraska.

On the other end of the scale, at least 10 counties with a significant number of bridges have none that are structurally deficient, according to the latest government statistics. A half-dozen of those are in Texas.

Several governors on Wednesday ordered state transportation officials to inspect particular bridges or review their inspection procedures.

Beyond Minnesota, North Dakota Gov. John Hoeven said his state doesn't have any bridges similar to the Minneapolis bridge but he had asked state officials to review inspection procedures. Presidential hopeful and New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson ordered an inspection of several steel-truss bridges in the state. Arizona Gov. Janet Napolitano directed state transportation officials to conduct a statewide review, starting with highly traveled bridges in urban areas.

Associated Press writers Jim Abrams, Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Jennifer Kerr in Washington and Frank Bass in East Dover, Vt., contributed to this report.

NOW THAT WE KNOW 70,000 BRIDGES ACROSS THE COUNTRY ARE RATED STRUCTURALLY DEFICIENT, JUST AS THE ONE IN MINNEAPOLIS THAT COLLAPSED, THE NAMES OF THESE BRIDGES AND THEIR LOCATIONS NEED TO BE RELEASED IN THE NAME OF PUBLIC INTEREST!!

HELLO, CONGRESS!!

GEE, MAYBE THAT'S WHY SUBCONSCIOUSLY I'VE ALWAYS BEEN WEARY OF DRIVING OVER BRIDGES WITH THE THOUGHT IN THE BACK OF MY HEAD THAT THEY COULD COLLAPSE!!

BlueAngel
08-03-2007, 09:43 AM
Just don't see the connection between a senator from Minneapolis and a bridge collapsing as conspiratorial.

Nor, do I see the pictures you posted as evidence that a BOMB went off.

The only conspiracy I see here is that the STATES do not receive enough funding to maintain and repair the bridges that are reported as structurally deficient before they collapse!

I guess we just have to wait for the other 7,000 to collapse during rush hour traffic before they receive funding to rebuild them.

Perhaps their motto is:

"If it ain't broken, don't fix it. Wait for it to collapse."

redrat11
08-03-2007, 06:16 PM
BlueAngel wrote:
Just don't see the connection between a senator from Minneapolis and a bridge collapsing as conspiratorial.

Nor, do I see the pictures you posted as evidence that a BOMB went off.

The only conspiracy I see here is that the STATES do not receive enough funding to maintain and repair the bridges that are reported as structurally deficient before they collapse!

I guess we just have to wait for the other 7,000 to collapse during rush hour traffic before they receive funding to rebuild them.

Perhaps their motto is:

"If it ain't broken, don't fix it. Wait for it to collapse."

Could you live without conspiracy theories? :-)

BlueAngel
08-03-2007, 07:51 PM
By Todd Melby
Fri Aug 3, 3:33 PM ET

MINNEAPOLIS (Reuters) - Politicians trying to account for one of the worst bridge collapses in U.S. history cast blame ranging from engineering faults to the Iraq war on Friday, while divers tried to reach the bodies of more victims in the Mississippi River's treacherous waters.

As investigators probed Wednesday's collapse that killed at least five people, Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty said outside experts would review the decisions of state engineers to shore up problems with the heavily-traveled 40-year-old bridge in central Minneapolis.

Engineers had decided to periodically inspect the steel superstructure beneath the Interstate 35W bridge and bolt on reinforcing plates where any flaws were found. But that work, which Pawlenty said fit in the state's budget, was postponed by resurfacing and repair work that was going on when the bridge buckled and fell.

"Experts that we rely on, technical experts and engineers, made some decisions about what needed to be done. They thought they were making an appropriate decision for their reasons, and now those decisions will have to be reviewed," Pawlenty said. A private engineering firm had been hired for the review.

"The bridge was declared fit for service," he said. "There will be tough questions asked, including by me, and we will get to the bottom of this."

U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar, a Minnesota Democrat, suggested Bush administration spending on the Iraq war may have crimped funding for domestic projects such as road and bridge construction, and for such infrastructure projects as new levees for New Orleans.

"We've spent $500 billion in Iraq and we have bridges falling down in this country," Klobuchar told MSNBC. "I see a connection between messed-up priorities."

Department of Transportation Secretary Mary Peters said billions of dollars were available for road and bridge repairs.

The bridge was a vital link over the Mississippi River and the most heavily used bridge in Minnesota with roughly 140,000 vehicles passing over each day.

"It is striking the bridge was carrying a load of traffic it was not designed for," said the Democratic Speaker of Minnesota's House, State Rep. Margaret Anderson Kelliher.

Estimates ranged as high as $500 million to rebuild it.

Visiting first lady Laura Bush praised the city's response: "We've seen the strength of your community, and because of that we're confident the bridge will be rebuilt and your city will heal."

President George W. Bush is scheduled to tour the scene on Saturday.

Pawlenty said a special legislative session may be in the offing to address funding to rebuild the bridge. Pawlenty's critics blamed him for vetoing a state gas-tax increase that would have boosted funding for construction projects.

Meanwhile, rescuers spent an entire day extracting the fifth fatality from under mounds of debris, Minneapolis Fire Chief Jim Clack said. He said more victims were certain to be found.

Divers searched submerged cars that tumbled 65 feet (20 meters) into the Mississippi River when the bridge collapsed with a roar.

"This is very dangerous work because the divers can get caught in the debris, some of which is razor-sharp," Clack said.

Divers battled swift currents, and had to feel their way in the muddy waters around twisted steel and chunks of concrete.

"You got gas in there, oil. Besides, the Mississippi River is not the cleanest place. You didn't have any visibility, you just felt," Minneapolis Fire Department diver Raoul Raymose said on CBS' "Early Show."

Hennepin County Sheriff Rich Stanek cautioned that his estimate of eight people still missing was "fluid" and subject to change.

Twenty-four of the nearly 100 people injured in the disaster remained in hospitals, including five who were in critical condition, a hospital spokesman said.

BlueAngel
08-03-2007, 08:44 PM
redrat11 wrote:

BlueAngel wrote:
Just don't see the connection between a senator from Minneapolis and a bridge collapsing as conspiratorial.

Nor, do I see the pictures you posted as evidence that a BOMB went off.

The only conspiracy I see here is that the STATES do not receive enough funding to maintain and repair the bridges that are reported as structurally deficient before they collapse!

I guess we just have to wait for the other 7,000 to collapse during rush hour traffic before they receive funding to rebuild them.

Perhaps their motto is:

"If it ain't broken, don't fix it. Wait for it to collapse."

Could you live without conspiracy theories? :-)

Every human being on the face of this planet lives with ONE BIG CONSPIRACY against humankind. As I've demonstrated, the collapsed bridge is not a conspiracy in my mind and I'm still breathing, so, yes, I can live without conspiracies and would perfer to do just that as most everyone else in our country and world would.

I certainly wouldn't KILL myself if there weren't any conspiracies. So, again, in answer to your question. Yes, I can live without them, but we are forced to live otherwise by those who have created our reality around them.

redrat11
08-03-2007, 10:03 PM
BlueAngel wrote:

redrat11 wrote:

BlueAngel wrote:
Just don't see the connection between a senator from Minneapolis and a bridge collapsing as conspiratorial.

Nor, do I see the pictures you posted as evidence that a BOMB went off.

The only conspiracy I see here is that the STATES do not receive enough funding to maintain and repair the bridges that are reported as structurally deficient before they collapse!

I guess we just have to wait for the other 7,000 to collapse during rush hour traffic before they receive funding to rebuild them.

Perhaps their motto is:

"If it ain't broken, don't fix it. Wait for it to collapse."

Could you live without conspiracy theories? :-)

Every human being on the face of this planet lives with ONE BIG CONSPIRACY against humankind. As I've demonstrated, the collapsed bridge is not a conspiracy in my mind and I'm still breathing, so, yes, I can live without conspiracies and would perfer to do just that as most everyone else in our country and world would.

I certainly wouldn't KILL myself if there weren't any conspiracies. So, again, in answer to your question. Yes, I can live without them, but we are forced to live otherwise by those who have created our reality around them.



Wrong Answer Blue Angel.....

We create our own destinies in "their" containment field of this planet, think about it this way, "they" control the money and power in this world, they allow us to somewhat live 'free' only if we don't upset their "containment field", so thus their "generosity" and "guidance" blind the masses into submission, however those who want out of the containment field finds themselves questioning everything in the world as conspiratorial, which is GOOD! I have no problem with free-thinkers....

BlueAngel
08-04-2007, 07:41 AM
RedRat said:

Wrong Answer Blue Angel.....

We create our own destinies in "their" containment field of this planet, think about it this way, "they" control the money and power in this world, they allow us to somewhat live 'free' only if we don't upset their "containment field", so thus their "generosity" and "guidance" blind the masses into submission, however those who want out of the containment field finds themselves questioning everything in the world as conspiratorial, which is GOOD! I have no problem with free-thinkers....

It is MY answer to a personal question.

Therefore, it cannot be wrong!

It wasn't a true or false question!!

It wasn't multiple choice!

It was my answer to a personal question!

Do you think your response to the question you asked me negates my answer and deems me wrong and you right?

What a power trip you're on!

redrat11
08-04-2007, 05:18 PM
BlueAngel wrote:
RedRat said:

Wrong Answer Blue Angel.....

We create our own destinies in "their" containment field of this planet, think about it this way, "they" control the money and power in this world, they allow us to somewhat live 'free' only if we don't upset their "containment field", so thus their "generosity" and "guidance" blind the masses into submission, however those who want out of the containment field finds themselves questioning everything in the world as conspiratorial, which is GOOD! I have no problem with free-thinkers....

It is MY answer to a personal question.

Therefore, it cannot be wrong!

It wasn't a true or false question!!

It wasn't multiple choice!

It was my answer to a personal question!

Do you think your response to the question you asked me negates my answer and deems me wrong and you right?

What a power trip you're on!

:-)

BlueAngel
08-04-2007, 06:45 PM
Bush surveys bridge, pledges aid By DEB RIECHMANN, Associated Press Writer
Sat Aug 4, 5:38 PM ET

MINNEAPOLIS - President Bush pledged Saturday to cut red tape that could delay rebuilding a highway bridge that once arched over the Mississippi River but now lies crumbled in muddy water concealing some victims.

Bush, still dogged by his administration's sluggish response to Hurricane Katrina, toured the site of Wednesday's collapse, which sent dozens of cars sliding into the river from the Minneapolis span. At least five people died and about 100 others were injured.

"Our message to the Twin Cities is, we want to get this bridge rebuilt as quick as possible, that we understand this is a main artery of life here that people count on this bridge and this highway system to get to work," Bush said as he stood next to the buckled spans, still littered with abandoned vehicles.

"There's a lot of paperwork involved with government," he said. "One of our jobs is to work with the governor and the mayor and the senators and the members of the Congress to cut through that paperwork, and to see if we can't get this bridge rebuilt in a way that not only expedites the flow of traffic, but in a way that can stand the test of time."

Divers continued searching the river for victims Saturday, pausing periodically so crews could remove debris that stood in the way. Eight or more people are believed trapped in the wreckage.

The government is providing a $5 million grant to help remove tons of debris and reroute traffic. Congress sought to direct $250 million to rebuild the bridge. A final vote awaited in the House on Saturday. Congress still would have to appropriate the money in future legislation.

Bush offered no timetable for rebuilding the bridge, a project he put in the hands of Transportation Secretary Mary Peters.

"I do promise she's going to listen to the local authorities to find out what the folks here need," Bush said. "I do promise that when she sees roadblocks and hurdles in the way of getting the job done, she'll do everything she can to eliminate them."

In recent months, Bush has had to console victims of several disasters. In March, he visited survivors of tornadoes that ripped through Alabama and Georgia. In April, he offered words of hope at Virginia Tech after a gunman killed 32 people and committed suicide. In May, Bush went to Kansas after a tornado wiped out the tiny town of Greensburg.

Whatever the tragedy, the administration's reaction inevitably is compared with its slow response to Katrina, which devastated the Gulf Coast in August 2005.

Bush flew to Minneapolis aboard Air Force One, then boarded the Marine One presidential helicopter for an aerial tour of the broken bridge, which had been rated structurally deficient by the government as far back as 1990.

Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty, Minneapolis Mayor R.T. Rybak and others conferred with Bush during the private flight.

"We talked about the specifics, about what we know about how the bridge fell and how we're going to rebuild it," Rybak said.

Back on the ground, the scene was eerily quiet as Bush descended a steep slope to the riverbank. The silence was broken only by the droning of turbines from a nearby power plant. Red and blue lights flashed from rescue boats as Bush surveyed the damage: A slab of concrete that resembled an Alpine ski jump; metal shaped like an accordion; straight reinforcement rods that now look like curved prongs of a pitchfork.

The president praised rescuers and investigators who are working "to find life, to go under these murky waters to find the facts, and it's going to take a while."

He talked with first responders, rescue workers, the families of two victims and people who witnessed the disaster. The president put on a hard hat and gazed at a school bus, still hugging the guardrail of a lane of the highway, which now looks like an uphill ramp to nowhere.

Gary Babineau, 24, of Blaine, Minn., a construction worker who helped bring the school bus children to safety, said his pickup truck fell about 30 feet but did not go into the water.

"When it fell, I saw the whole bridge fall in front of me, just disappear," said Babineau, who was on his way home from work when the bridge collapsed. "All the cars disappeared. I had a free fall and just landed incredibly hard thought my back might have been broken."

Despite his ordeal, Babineau assigned no blame.

"I think if someone did not think it was safe to drive on I think they would have come forward and if they didn't, you know, shame on you. These things do happen. I don't think it's anyone's fault," Babineau said.

Federal transportation officials have announced plans to investigate the agency responsible for inspecting highway bridges. The inspector general for the Transportation Department said the inquiry would focus on the Federal Highway Administration's inspection program and ways to improve the agency's oversight of more than 70,000 bridges that have been found structurally deficient.

Federal and state officials are working with the National Transportation Safety Board to understand why the bridge collapsed.

"I don't want to speculate before they get in and complete their work about what the cause was, but clearly this was not something that we expected to happen given the history of this bridge, the inspection process and how this bridge was rated," Peters said during the flight with Bush to Minnesota.

She spoke about the need to find better ways in the future to prioritize spending on roads, bridges and other public works.

"We certainly have aging infrastructure here in the United States ... but I do believe that American highways and bridges are safe," Peters said. "But certainly we need to look to the future and make sure that we are spending our money where we need to be spending the money."

--------------------------------------------------

Isn't it grand when the government has us at their mercy, allows disasters/terrorist attacks to occur and then the President steps in and portrays the protector role by pledging aid. Role reversal. Abuser/Protector/ - Protector/Abuser. Reminds me of my handler/controller.

redrat11
08-04-2007, 06:55 PM
BlueAngel wrote:
Bush surveys bridge, pledges aid By DEB RIECHMANN, Associated Press Writer
Sat Aug 4, 5:38 PM ET

MINNEAPOLIS - President Bush pledged Saturday to cut red tape that could delay rebuilding a highway bridge that once arched over the Mississippi River but now lies crumbled in muddy water concealing some victims.

Bush, still dogged by his administration's sluggish response to Hurricane Katrina, toured the site of Wednesday's collapse, which sent dozens of cars sliding into the river from the Minneapolis span. At least five people died and about 100 others were injured.

"Our message to the Twin Cities is, we want to get this bridge rebuilt as quick as possible, that we understand this is a main artery of life here that people count on this bridge and this highway system to get to work," Bush said as he stood next to the buckled spans, still littered with abandoned vehicles.

"There's a lot of paperwork involved with government," he said. "One of our jobs is to work with the governor and the mayor and the senators and the members of the Congress to cut through that paperwork, and to see if we can't get this bridge rebuilt in a way that not only expedites the flow of traffic, but in a way that can stand the test of time."

Divers continued searching the river for victims Saturday, pausing periodically so crews could remove debris that stood in the way. Eight or more people are believed trapped in the wreckage.

The government is providing a $5 million grant to help remove tons of debris and reroute traffic. Congress sought to direct $250 million to rebuild the bridge. A final vote awaited in the House on Saturday. Congress still would have to appropriate the money in future legislation.

Bush offered no timetable for rebuilding the bridge, a project he put in the hands of Transportation Secretary Mary Peters.

"I do promise she's going to listen to the local authorities to find out what the folks here need," Bush said. "I do promise that when she sees roadblocks and hurdles in the way of getting the job done, she'll do everything she can to eliminate them."

In recent months, Bush has had to console victims of several disasters. In March, he visited survivors of tornadoes that ripped through Alabama and Georgia. In April, he offered words of hope at Virginia Tech after a gunman killed 32 people and committed suicide. In May, Bush went to Kansas after a tornado wiped out the tiny town of Greensburg.

Whatever the tragedy, the administration's reaction inevitably is compared with its slow response to Katrina, which devastated the Gulf Coast in August 2005.

Bush flew to Minneapolis aboard Air Force One, then boarded the Marine One presidential helicopter for an aerial tour of the broken bridge, which had been rated structurally deficient by the government as far back as 1990.

Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty, Minneapolis Mayor R.T. Rybak and others conferred with Bush during the private flight.

"We talked about the specifics, about what we know about how the bridge fell and how we're going to rebuild it," Rybak said.

Back on the ground, the scene was eerily quiet as Bush descended a steep slope to the riverbank. The silence was broken only by the droning of turbines from a nearby power plant. Red and blue lights flashed from rescue boats as Bush surveyed the damage: A slab of concrete that resembled an Alpine ski jump; metal shaped like an accordion; straight reinforcement rods that now look like curved prongs of a pitchfork.

The president praised rescuers and investigators who are working "to find life, to go under these murky waters to find the facts, and it's going to take a while."

He talked with first responders, rescue workers, the families of two victims and people who witnessed the disaster. The president put on a hard hat and gazed at a school bus, still hugging the guardrail of a lane of the highway, which now looks like an uphill ramp to nowhere.

Gary Babineau, 24, of Blaine, Minn., a construction worker who helped bring the school bus children to safety, said his pickup truck fell about 30 feet but did not go into the water.

"When it fell, I saw the whole bridge fall in front of me, just disappear," said Babineau, who was on his way home from work when the bridge collapsed. "All the cars disappeared. I had a free fall and just landed incredibly hard thought my back might have been broken."

Despite his ordeal, Babineau assigned no blame.

"I think if someone did not think it was safe to drive on I think they would have come forward and if they didn't, you know, shame on you. These things do happen. I don't think it's anyone's fault," Babineau said.

Federal transportation officials have announced plans to investigate the agency responsible for inspecting highway bridges. The inspector general for the Transportation Department said the inquiry would focus on the Federal Highway Administration's inspection program and ways to improve the agency's oversight of more than 70,000 bridges that have been found structurally deficient.

Federal and state officials are working with the National Transportation Safety Board to understand why the bridge collapsed.

"I don't want to speculate before they get in and complete their work about what the cause was, but clearly this was not something that we expected to happen given the history of this bridge, the inspection process and how this bridge was rated," Peters said during the flight with Bush to Minnesota.

She spoke about the need to find better ways in the future to prioritize spending on roads, bridges and other public works.

"We certainly have aging infrastructure here in the United States ... but I do believe that American highways and bridges are safe," Peters said. "But certainly we need to look to the future and make sure that we are spending our money where we need to be spending the money."

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Isn't it grand when the government has us at their mercy, allows disasters/terrorist attacks to occur and then the President steps in and portrays the protector role by pledging aid. Role reversal. Abuser/Protector/ - Protector/Abuser. Reminds me of my handler/controller.

The President of the Unites States of America, Maam... 8-)

redrat11
08-07-2007, 08:03 PM
Interesting story about the (possible) cause of the collapse.

http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=57017

redrat11
08-09-2007, 07:20 PM
hmmmm...


http://www.iamthewitness.com/Bridge-Collapse.html

BlueAngel
08-09-2007, 08:59 PM
Why is this person's website address:

I AM THE WITNESS?

BlueAngel
08-10-2007, 08:19 AM
So, if you consider that the bridge collapse was an "inside job" and not due to structural deficiency what then is the reason?