PDA

View Full Version : New Flu Spreading Like Wildfire


stompk
04-26-2009, 06:24 AM
Now there are 85 deaths in Mexico, a dozen cases in the US, a pocket of infections in New Zealand, a British Airways crew under quarantine.

Disease and pestilence has arrived.

Entropy
04-26-2009, 01:22 PM
I've been lurking around here for quite some time, but after the past few days, I had to make a post about this.

This breakout of swine flu, seems extremely disturbing. Health organizations arent answering many questions about the disease, as well as finding a vaccine for humans, even though a vaccine is available to pigs.

And is it not strange that the virus has been found in states that are on all sides of the country?
The West: California
The East: New York
The South: Texas
Midwest: Ohio
Western Midwest: Kansas

Watch this, and tell me this is not unnerving.

YouTube - EMERGENCY UPDATE: Avian Influenza H5N1

BlueAngel
04-26-2009, 08:16 PM
I wouldn't classify the number of Swine flu cases reported as SPREADING LIKE WILDFIRE.

BlueAngel
04-26-2009, 08:33 PM
World govts race to contain swine flu outbreak (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/med_swine_flu)

World govts race to contain swine flu outbreak

New York AP – By LAURAN NEERGAARD, AP Medical Writer
Lauran Neergaard, Ap Medical Writer – 15 mins ago

WASHINGTON – The world's governments raced to avoid both a pandemic and global hysteria Sunday as more possible swine flu cases surfaced from Canada to New Zealand and the United States declared a public health emergency. "It's not a time to panic," the White House said.

Mexico, the outbreak's epicenter with up to 86 suspected deaths, canceled some church services and closed markets, restaurants and movie theaters. A televised variety show filled its seats with cardboard cutouts. Few people ventured onto the streets, and some wore face masks.

Canada confirmed cases in six people, including some students who — like some New York City spring-breakers — got mildly ill in Mexico. Countries across Asia promised to quarantine feverish travelers returning from flu-affected areas.

The U.S. declared the health emergency so it could ship roughly 12 million doses of flu-fighting medications from a federal stockpile to states in case they eventually need them — although, with 20 confirmed cases of people recovering easily, they don't appear to for now.

Make no mistake: There is not a global pandemic — at least not yet. It's not clear how many people truly have this particular strain, or why all countries but Mexico are seeing mild disease. Nor is it clear if the new virus spreads easily, one milestone that distinguishes a bad flu from a global crisis. But waiting to take protective steps until after a pandemic is declared would be too late.

"We do think this will continue to spread but we are taking aggressive actions to minimize the impact on people's health," said Dr. Richard Besser, acting chief of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

President Barack Obama's administration sought to look both calm and in command, striking a balance between informing Americans without panicking them. Obama himself was playing golf while U.S. officials used a White House news conference to compare the emergency declaration with preparing for an approaching hurricane.

"We're preparing in an environment where we really don't know ultimately what the size or seriousness of this outbreak is going to be," Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano told reporters.

Earlier, White House press secretary Robert Gibbs said the outbreak was serious, but that the public should know "it's not a time to panic." He told NBC's "Meet the Press" that Obama was getting updates "every few hours."

In Mexico, soldiers handed out 6 million surgical-style masks to deal with a deadly flu strain that officials say may have sickened 1,400 people since April 13. Special laboratory tests to confirm how many died from it — 22 have been confirmed so far out of 86 suspected deaths — are taking time.

The World Bank said it would send Mexico $25 million in loans for immediate aid and $180 million in long-term assistance to address the outbreak, along with advice on how other nations have dealt with similar crises.

A potential pandemic virus is defined, among other things, as a novel strain that's not easily treated. This new strain can be treated with Tamiflu and Relenza, but not two older flu drugs. Also, the WHO wants to know if it's easily spread from one person to a second who then spreads it again — something U.S. officials suspect and are investigating.

"Right now we have cases occurring in a couple of different countries and in multiple locations, but we also know that in the modern world that cases can simply move around from single locations and not really become established," cautioned WHO flu chief Dr. Keiji Fukuda.

There is no vaccine against swine flu, but the CDC has taken the initial step necessary for producing one — creating a seed stock of the virus — should authorities decide that's necessary. Last winter's flu shot offers no cross-protection to the new virus, although it's possible that older people exposed to various Type A flu strains in the past may have some immunity, CDC officials said Sunday.

Worldwide, attention focused sharply on travelers.

"It was acquired in Mexico, brought home and spread," Nova Scotia's chief public health officer, Dr. Robert Strang, said of Canada's first four confirmed cases, in student travelers.

New Zealand said 10 students who took a school trip to Mexico probably had swine flu, and on Monday it said three students in a second group just back from Mexico probably have it as well. Spanish authorities had seven suspected cases under observation. In Brazil, a hospital said a patient who arrived from Mexico was hospitalized with some swine flu symptoms. A New York City school where eight cases are confirmed will be closed Monday and Tuesday, and 14 schools in Texas, including a high school where two cases were confirmed, will be closed for at least the next week.

China, Russia, Taiwan and Bolivia began planning to quarantine travelers arriving from flu-affected areas if they have symptoms. Italy, Poland and Venezuela advised citizens to postpone travel to affected parts of Mexico and the U.S.

Multiple airlines, including American, United, Continental, US Airways, Mexicana and Air Canada, are waiving their usual penalties for changing reservations for anyone traveling to, from or through Mexico, but have not canceled flights.

Officials along the U.S.-Mexico border were asking health care providers to take respiratory samples from patients who appear to have the flu. Travelers were being asked if they visited flu-stricken areas.

The U.S. hasn't advised against travel to Mexico but does urge precautions such as frequent hand-washing while there, and has begun questioning arriving travelers about flu symptoms.

___

Associated Press writers Mark Stevenson and Olga R. Rodriguez in Mexico City; Frank Jordans in Geneva; Mike Stobbe in Atlanta; and Maria Cheng in London contributed to this report.

------------------------------------------------------------

Containment sounds good to me.

That would mean that no one is allowed in or out of Mexico.

BlueAngel
04-26-2009, 09:42 PM
Here's my two cents.

The first containment measure should be that Mexico is quarantined.

No one is allowed in or out of Mexico.

Doesn't take a CDC official to figure this out.

Is swine flu 'the big one' or a flu that fizzles? (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090427/ap_on_bi_ge/med_swine_flu_reality_check)

Is swine flu 'the big one' or a flu that fizzles?

By MIKE STOBBE, AP Medical Writer

Mike Stobbe, Ap Medical Writer – Sun Apr 26, 2009

8:03 pm ET

ATLANTA – As reports of a unique form of swine flu erupt around the world, the inevitable question arises: Is this the big one?

Is this the next big global flu epidemic that public health experts have long anticipated and worried about? Is this the novel virus that will kill millions around the world, as pandemics did in 1918, 1957 and 1968?

The short answer is it's too soon to tell.

"What makes this so difficult is we may be somewhere between an important but yet still uneventful public health occurrence here — with something that could literally die out over the next couple of weeks and never show up again — or this could be the opening act of a full-fledged influenza pandemic," said Michael Osterholm, a prominent expert on global flu outbreaks with the University of Minnesota.

"We have no clue right now where we are between those two extremes. That's the problem," he said.

Health officials want to take every step to prevent an outbreak from spiraling into mass casualties. Predicting influenza is a dicey endeavor, with the U.S. government famously guessing wrong in 1976 about a swine flu pandemic that never materialized.

"The first lesson is anyone who tries to predict influenza often goes down in flames," said Dr. Richard Wenzel, the immediate past president of the International Society for Infectious Diseases.

But health officials are being asked to make such predictions, as panic began to set in over the weekend.

The epicenter was Mexico, where the virus is blamed for 86 deaths and an estimated 1,400 cases in the country since April 13. Schools were closed, church services canceled and Mexican President Felipe Calderon assumed new powers to isolate people infected with the swine flu virus.

International concern magnified as health officials across the world on Sunday said they were investigating suspected cases in people who traveled to Mexico and come back with flu-like illnesses. Among the nations reporting confirmed cases or investigations were Canada, France, Israel and New Zealand.

Meanwhile, in the United States, there were no deaths and all patients had either recovered or were recovering. But the confirmed cases around the nation rose from eight on Saturday morning to 20 by Sunday afternoon, including eight high school kids in New York City — a national media center. The New York Post's front page headline on Sunday was "Pig Flu Panic."

The concern level rose even more when federal officials on Sunday declared a public health emergency — a procedural step, they said, to mobilize antiviral medicine and other resources and be ready if the U.S. situation gets worse.

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention officials say that so far swine flu cases in this country have been mild. But they also say more cases are likely to be reported, at least partly because doctors and health officials across the country are looking intensively for suspicious cases.

And, troublingly, more severe cases are also likely, said Dr. Richard Besser, the CDC's acting director, in a Sunday news conference.

"As we continue to look for cases, we are going to see a broader spectrum of disease," he predicted. "We're going to see more severe disease in this country."

Besser also repeated what health officials have said since the beginning — they don't understand why the illnesses in Mexico have been more numerous and severe than in the United States. In fact, it's not even certain that new infections are occurring. The numbers could be rising simply because everyone's on the lookout.

He also said comparison to past pandemics are difficult.

"Every outbreak is unique," Besser said.

The new virus is called a swine flu, though it contains genetic segments from humans and birds viruses as well as from pigs from North America, Europe and Asia. Health officials had seen combinations of bird, pig and human virus before — but never such an intercontinental mix, including more than one pig virus.

More disturbing, this virus seems to spread among people more easily than past swine flus that have sometimes jumped from pigs to people.

There's a historical cause for people to worry.

Flu pandemics have been occurring with some regularity since at least the 1500s, but the frame of reference for health officials is the catastrophe of 1918-19. That one killed an estimated 20 to 50 million people worldwide.

Disease testing and tracking were far less sophisticated then, but the virus appeared in humans and pigs at about the same time and it was known as both Spanish flu and swine flu. Experts since then have said the deadly germ actually originated in birds.

But pigs may have made it worse. That pandemic began with a wave of mild illness that hit in the spring of 1918, followed by a far deadlier wave in the fall which was most lethal to young, healthy adults. Scientists have speculated that something happened to the virus after the first wave — one theory held that it infected pigs or other animals and mutated there — before revisiting humans in a deadlier form.

Pigs are considered particularly susceptible to both bird and human viruses and a likely place where the kind of genetic reassortment can take place that might lead to a new form of deadly, easily spread flu, scientists believe.

Such concern triggered public health alarm in 1976, when soldiers at Fort Dix, N.J., became sick with an unusual form of swine flu.

Federal officials vaccinated 40 million Americans. The pandemic never materialized, but thousands who got the shots filed injury claims, saying they suffered a paralyzing condition and other side effects from the vaccinations.

To this day, health officials don't know why the 1976 virus petered out.

Flu shots have been offered in the United States since the 1940s, but new types of flu viruses have remained a threat. Global outbreaks occurred again in 1957 and 1968, though the main victims were the elderly and chronically ill.

In the last several years, experts have been focused on a form of bird flu that was first reported in Asia. It's a highly deadly strain that has killed more than 250 people worldwide since 2003. Health officials around the world have taken steps to prepare for the possibility of that becoming a global outbreak, but to date that virus has not gained the ability to spread easily from person to person.

stompk
04-27-2009, 06:44 PM
World govts race to contain swine flu outbreak (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/med_swine_flu)

World govts race to contain swine flu outbreak

New York AP – By LAURAN NEERGAARD, AP Medical Writer
Lauran Neergaard, Ap Medical Writer – 15 mins ago


A potential pandemic virus is defined, among other things, as a novel strain that's not easily treated. This new strain can be treated with Tamiflu and Relenza,

Where did they get this information??


The above translation describes two patients in the Netherlands who died from infection with Tamiflu resistant H1N1. Their immune system was compromised, and the H1N1 was not susceptible to Tamiflu (oseltamivir) treatment.
Fatal Tamiflu Resistant H1N1 Cases in The Netherlands (http://www.recombinomics.com/News/05230801/H274Y_Fatal.html)

stompk
04-27-2009, 06:59 PM
The flu has now been confirmed in Colorado.

Has everyone seen The Stand?

Entropy
04-28-2009, 02:00 PM
Swine flu has arrived in Indiana.

My current living quarters.

BlueAngel
04-30-2009, 05:09 PM
STOP the fear mongering, NOW!

BlueAngel
04-30-2009, 05:21 PM
Mexico's health chief hopeful swine flu has slowed

Mexico's health chief hopeful swine flu has slowed (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090430/ap_on_he_me/med_swine_flu)

Excerpt:

'The U.S. caseload rose slightly to 109 as schools nationwide shut their doors, and the crisis even reached the White House, which said an aide to the secretary of energy apparently got sick helping arrange a presidential trip to Mexico.'

How does someone get sick helping to arrange a presidential trip to Mexico? Did he travel to Mexico or merely help arrange the trip while in the US? They say the aide got sick. Did he get sick or did he contract the Swine flu?

AP – Swine flu vaccine in the works

Swine flu alert level raised

Reuters AP – By PAUL HAVEN and NIKO PRICE,
Associated Press Writers Paul Haven And Niko Price, Associated Press Writers –

3 mins ago

MEXICO CITY – Mexico's top medical officer voiced optimism Thursday that swine flu has slowed in the nation hardest hit by the virus, but the World Health Organization cautioned there is no evidence the worst of the global outbreak is over. The U.S. caseload rose slightly to 109 as schools nationwide shut their doors, and the crisis even reached the White House, which said an aide to the secretary of energy apparently got sick helping arrange a presidential trip to Mexico.

European health ministers holding an emergency meeting in Luxembourg vowed to work quickly with drugmakers to rush a vaccine into production, but American health officials suggested inoculations could not begin until fall at the earliest.

Mexican Health Secretary Jose Angel Cordova told The Associated Press new cases have leveled off and the death rate has been nearly flat for several days. He said the next few days would be critical in determining whether the virus was truly on the decline.

"The fact that we have a stabilization in the daily numbers, even a drop, makes us optimistic," he said. "Because what we'd expect is geometric or exponential growth. And that hasn't been the situation. So we think we're on the right track."

The health ministry, which earlier said 168 people were believed killed by swine flu in Mexico, on Thursday would only confirm 12 of those deaths and would not say how many were suspected.

The World Health Organization's top flu official, responding to similarly hopeful remarks from other Mexican officials, sounded a more cautious note about whether the virus had peaked.

"For things to go up and down in a country is expected. If it didn't do that would be very unusual," Dr. Keiji Fukuda said in Geneva. "Hopefully we'll see more of the data of what's going on there. But I expect even in Mexico you will see a mixed picture."

Mexico has imposed what amounts to a five-day shutdown of the country, beginning Friday, in hopes of slowing the virus. All but the most essential government services will be suspended, most businesses have been urged to close, and Mexicans have been encouraged to stay in their homes.

On Wednesday, the WHO said swine flu threatened to become a pandemic, and for the first time it raised its threat level to Phase 5, the second-highest. Fukuda said Thursday there were no immediate signs that warranted declaring a Phase 6 pandemic.

Phase 5 means a virus has spread into at least two countries and is causing large outbreaks. Phase 6 means outbreaks have been detected in two or more regions of the world and a pandemic is under way.

The only confirmed U.S. swine flu death so far is a Mexican toddler who succumbed earlier this week in Texas. New cases of swine flu were confirmed Thursday in Europe, but no deaths have been reported outside North America.

In the United States, Vice President Joe Biden stirred concern by saying in an NBC interview that he would discourage family members from flying or even taking the subway because of the swine flu threat.

The White House insisted Biden meant to say he was discouraging nonessential travel to Mexico, and Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood was compelled to state flatly: "It is safe to fly. There is no reason to cancel flights."

The U.S. government has urged Americans to wash their hands and to stay home from work and avoid traveling if they feel ill.

Also in Washington, the Obama administration said an aide to Energy Secretary Steven Chu apparently got sick helping arrange President Barack Obama's recent trip to Mexico. The aide did not fly on Air Force One and never posed a risk to the president, the White House said.

The U.S. is taking extraordinary precautions, including shipping millions of doses of anti-flu drugs to states. Scientists cannot predict what a new virus might do, and the outbreak could always resurge later.

Scientists are racing to prepare the key ingredient to make a vaccine against the strain, but it will take several months before human testing can begin. Production would not start until fall.

"I don't want anybody to have false expectations," Health and Human Services Assistant Secretary Craig Vanderwagen told reporters. "The science is challenging here." He said 600 million doses in six months was "achievable" based on a fall start.

In hopes of avoiding confusion, the WHO announced it will stop using the term "swine flu," opting for the bug's scientific name, H1N1 influenza A. Obama administration officials have also pointedly referred to the virus as H1N1 in recent days.

Alarm over swine flu led Egypt to begin slaughtering hundreds of thousands of pigs in what medical experts say is a misguided attempt to prevent the virus.

The WHO raised its tally of confirmed cases around the world to 257 from 148, with most of the new cases from Mexico. The worldwide count is believed to be considerably higher, and the WHO count lags behind what individual countries report.

Switzerland and the Netherlands became the latest countries to report infections, and Canada confirmed 15 more mild cases on Thursday. New Zealand, Britain, Germany, Spain, Israel and Austria also have confirmed cases.

In the United States, cases have been confirmed by federal and state officials coast to coast. Nearly 300 schools were closed Thursday, including at least 200 in Texas and 62 in Alabama.

The Red Cross said it was readying an army of 60 million volunteers who can be deployed around the world to help slow the virus' spread, including by educating people about hygiene and caring for the sick.

Already, the looming shutdown was being felt in Mexico City. Traffic cleared in the notoriously clogged avenues, and the attorney general's office said even crime was down one-third compared with last week.

Mexico City's infamous smog dropped to levels normally seen only on holidays, said Jorge Fuentes, spokesman for Mexico City's Atmospheric Monitoring System, though he noted the air quality was still technically "bad."

Mexican President Felipe Calderon said authorities would use the five-day partial shutdown in Mexico to consider whether to extend emergency measures or ease some restrictions. The dates include a weekend and two holidays, Labor Day and Cinco de Mayo, minimizing the added disruption.

Cordova told the AP that Mexico City's shutdown, already in motion for days, was starting to work. Most of the Mexicans hospitalized with confirmed cases of swine flu have already been released, and he expects the suspected death toll to drop as health officials do further tests.

"Without a doubt, once we study all the cases we're going to see some where there is no evidence or justification for linking them to this virus," he said.

"I think, given the evolution this is having, given the full recovery we are seeing with treatment, there is reason to be calmer, there's reason to think that this can be solved quickly and well," he said. "We simply have a new virus with what is fortunately a low mortality rate ... so I think this problem will be resolved favorably."

Swine flu is a mix of pig, bird and human genes to which people have limited natural immunity. It has symptoms nearly identical to regular flu — fever, cough and sore throat — and spreads similarly, through tiny particles in the air, when people cough or sneeze. About 36,000 people die each year of flu in the United States.

___

AP writers contributing to this report included Frank Jordans in Geneva; Lauran Neergaard in Washington; Alexandra Olson, Morgan Lee and E. Eduardo Castillo in Mexico City; Mike Corder in The Hague, Netherlands; and Balz Bruppacher in Bern, Switzerland.

--------------------------------------------------------------------

Excerpt:

'The U.S. caseload rose slightly to 109 as schools nationwide shut their doors, and the crisis even reached the White House, which said an aide to the secretary of energy apparently got sick helping arrange a presidential trip to Mexico.'

How does someone get sick helping to arrange a presidential trip to Mexico? Did he travel to Mexico or merely help arrange the trip while in the US? They say the aide got sick. Did he get sick or did he contract the Swine flu?

Entropy
04-30-2009, 05:23 PM
STOP the fear mongering, NOW!

Ive been reading your posts for a while.

And Im not even going to begin to say anything.

But I will say, try, just once... once....

To not push the return button after every fucking sentence typed.

And learn how to capitalize things correctly.

Consider it.

BlueAngel
04-30-2009, 06:29 PM
Ive been reading your posts for a while.

And Im not even going to begin to say anything.

But I will say, try, just once... once....

To not push the return button after every fucking sentence typed.

And learn how to capitalize things correctly.

Consider it.

But, you did begin to say something.

I capitalize correctly and I like to push the return button so there isn't anything to consider.

To whom do you think I was speaking when I said:

STOP the fear mongering, NOW!?!

I'm glad to know you've been enjoying reading my posts for a while.

:rolleyes:

stompk
04-30-2009, 06:51 PM
Have you seen this map?

2009 H1N1 Flu Outbreak Map - Google Maps (http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UTF8&hl=en&msa=0&msid=109496610648025582911.0004686892fbefe515012&z=3)

No time to bicker. Time to get serious. This could be the big one. A bioengineered weapon of mass destruction. Who's to say the terrorists didn't do it? Who's to say?

BlueAngel
04-30-2009, 07:04 PM
168 deaths in Mexico.

One death in the US and it was a Mexican child who was brought to the US by his/her mother for medical care.

Most of the "FLU" reported cases on this map for countries other than Mexico, indicate "probable" and/or "suspected" cases.

Entropy
04-30-2009, 07:09 PM
Have you seen this map?

2009 H1N1 Flu Outbreak Map - Google Maps (http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UTF8&hl=en&msa=0&msid=109496610648025582911.0004686892fbefe515012&z=3)

No time to bicker. Time to get serious. This could be the big one. A bioengineered weapon of mass destruction. Who's to say the terrorists didn't do it? Who's to say?

Thank you so much for that link. I was trying to search for something like that a few days ago.

How exactly do you search for a map like that?

BlueAngel
04-30-2009, 07:11 PM
168 deaths in Mexico.

One death in the US and it was a Mexican child who was brought to the US by his/her mother for medical care.

Most of the "FLU" reported cases on this map for countries other than Mexico, indicate "probable" and/or "suspected" cases.

QUOTE!

stompk
04-30-2009, 07:12 PM
Check this out.


As of yesterday, the CDC had reports of 64 lab-confirmed cases of swine flu in California, Kansas, New York City, Ohio, and Texas.

Because the CDC is updating its tally once a day, yesterday's CDC figure does not include another confirmed case in California and one in Indiana; those two cases would put the figure at 66 people with lab-confirmed swine flu in the U.S.
CDC Confirms First U.S. Swine Flu Death (http://www.webmd.com/cold-and-flu/news/20090429/cdc-confirms-first-swine-flu-death-us?src=RSS_PUBLIC)


They are confirming the cases at ONE POINT in the US! WTF.

While the flu spreads like wildfire, the CDC refuses to release the re-agent.


Engel also said the state will soon receive the reagent material that’s necessary to confirm the presence of swine flu in the state. Currently, the state can test to determine if a patient likely has swine flu, but final lab work must be sent to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
No signs of swine flu found in N.C. | BlueRidgeNow.com | Times-News Online | Hendersonville, NC (http://www.blueridgenow.com/article/20090430/NEWS/904299930/1042?Title=No-signs-of-swine-flu-found-in-N-C-)


This is a biological attack on the good citizens of the world.

BlueAngel
04-30-2009, 07:15 PM
Ah, when did the CDC say they refused to release the re-agent?

They said the state will soon receive the reagent material that's necessary to confirm the presence of swine flu.

Currently, a state can test to determine if the patient likely has swine flu.

BlueAngel
04-30-2009, 07:29 PM
Have you seen this map?

2009 H1N1 Flu Outbreak Map - Google Maps (http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UTF8&hl=en&msa=0&msid=109496610648025582911.0004686892fbefe515012&z=3)

No time to bicker. Time to get serious. This could be the big one. A bioengineered weapon of mass destruction. Who's to say the terrorists didn't do it? Who's to say?

Why isn't there any time to bicker?

What?

Should we spend all of our time sittin' around thinking and worrying about the Swine flu?

BlueAngel
04-30-2009, 07:35 PM
36,000 people die each year from the flu.

stompk
04-30-2009, 07:38 PM
Why isn't there any time to bicker?

What?

Should we spend all of our time sittin' around thinking and worrying about the Swine flu?

Might want to invest in some canned food, bottled water and other basics.

If it turns out you don't need it, you can still eat it.

It will bring comfort in difficult times.

BlueAngel
04-30-2009, 07:39 PM
Might want to invest in some canned food, bottled water and other basics.

If it turns out you don't need it, you can still eat it.

It will bring comfort in difficult times.

I already have canned food, bottled water and other basics.

BlueAngel
04-30-2009, 07:50 PM
Just what the people of New York needed while WHO raised the alert to number 4 regarding this virus was to have one of the President's 747's accompanied by an air force fighter jet flying over the streets of New York City and Ground Zero en route to the Statue of Liberty for a photo op of one of the President's planes.

Apparently, the Mayor wasn't advised as to this operation but the police department and one of his aides were.

Buildings were evacuated.

Surely, they could have chosen a better time and a better place.

layinglow1
05-01-2009, 03:19 PM
It's not hard to connect the dots, here. If you've been watching the news, you should have gotten the same feeling as I have, which is, "What? This makes no sense." For every report that makes you go, "hmmm..." you have your answer. Why is the govt. freaking out over a seemingly harmless flu? Answer: it's not harmless. Why are schools being shut down for the flu? Because the govt. knows something the public doesn't. Why are they dying in Mexico, and not here in the US? Answer: No one has died in the US....YET. The govt. knows and has said that US deaths are "imminent." How would they know that? They know because of what is happening in Mexico.

Timeline:

In March there was an unusually high spike of flu cases in Mexico, but they thought it was just a late spike in the "normal" flu season. Those people got sick, then got better....(sound familiar?).

Fast forward a few weeks, maybe a month. Those same people who got sick and then got better....got sick AGAIN...only this time the illness was much stronger, and people started to die.

Jump back to two years ago, when the avian flu was a huge scare that petered out, and the WHO invented a new "scale" for outbreaks....

Jump back to the present, where we know the virus contains both bird AND pig dna....a.k.a. the avian flu DID mutate, infected pigs, mutated again, infected humans and became a contained strain within the human race.

In other words, this virus has shown the ability to mutate not once, not twice, but three separate times....beginning two years ago...avian flu H5N1....now it's swine flu, H1NI....and the WHO is scared to death, because they have admitted they've never seen anything like this before...

Not only does it mutate to infect humans, it also mutates inside our bodies, laying dormant at first, so we seem to get better....then a few weeks to a month later, we get sick again, only THIS time it is fatal. That is why they are dying in Mexico, and not here in the US. The Mexico deaths are the SECOND phase of the illness.

How did the US come up with a positive test for swine flu so quickly? How did they implement the written directions, ship the hundreds of thousands of extra viles, swabs and instructions to every doctor's clinic in the US so quickly? Think about it.

Why are they telling anyone with a fever to get tested? Every person that tests positive for this flu goes on a list that is sent to the CDC, WHO and local govt. They are cataloguing these people. If you test positive, they know your name, address, social security # and everything else about you. AND they know that in a month or less, even though you seem to have recovered, you will be dead.

If I am right, the people who have tested positive already, who seem to be "getting better," will get sick again in the next few weeks, and they will begin to die....if I'm right about the govt. already knowing about the two-step process of this illness, they will begin to quietly round up these infected people in the next few weeks, and quarantine them.

If I'm wrong....I look stupid....but if you ask the simple questions, follow the timeline and really look at how events have unfolded the last two years, and specifically the last two months...it's not that hard to come up with my theory.....

When you are watching the news and you get a feeling while listening to these reports that something just doesn't jive, doesn't make sense...listen to that feeling. It is your mind seeing the holes in these reports and latching onto them....

lastly, there is something to do with the whole fever of 101.5....that's an odd number, very specific....there's something there as well....maybe the virus cannot mutate unless it incubates at that temp or higher?

There are a lot of holes in the news reports...you only have to follow the bread crumbs backwards to see what I'm seeing. Look for yourself.....

stompk
05-01-2009, 05:52 PM
To Layinglow1;
Hmm, very interesting. Thanks for your input. I feel your gut feeling, and your logic is good.
Nice post.

layinglow1
05-01-2009, 05:53 PM
"It may turn out that H1N1 runs its course like ordinary flus, in which case we will have prepared and we won't need all these preparations," Obama said.
But "we're taking it seriously," he said. Even if the flu turns out mild now, it could come back in a deadlier form during the normal flu season, he said."


"Even if the flu turns out mild now, it could come back in a deadlier form during the normal flu season......."


------And there you have it....a subtle way of letting it slip, to absolve the govt. of any foreknowledge that it WILL come back, sooner than anyone thinks...and WAY before the "normal flu season."


Thoughts anyone??? :confused:

Entropy
05-01-2009, 07:52 PM
"It may turn out that H1N1 runs its course like ordinary flus, in which case we will have prepared and we won't need all these preparations," Obama said.
But "we're taking it seriously," he said. Even if the flu turns out mild now, it could come back in a deadlier form during the normal flu season, he said."


"Even if the flu turns out mild now, it could come back in a deadlier form during the normal flu season......."


------And there you have it....a subtle way of letting it slip, to absolve the govt. of any foreknowledge that it WILL come back, sooner than anyone thinks...and WAY before the "normal flu season."


Thoughts anyone??? :confused:


Wow. How many times have we heard such a subtle giveaway and seen it turn out to be a reality beyond comprehension?

Disturbing, scary stuff.

BlueAngel
05-01-2009, 08:51 PM
Swine flu may be less potent than first feared (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/med_swine_flu)

Swine flu may be less potent than first feared

By MIKE STOBBE and DAVID B. CARUSO, Associated Press Writers

Mike Stobbe And David B. Caruso, Associated Press Writers – 42 mins ago

The swine flu outbreak that has alarmed the world for a week now appears less ominous, with the virus showing little staying power in the hardest-hit cities and scientists suggesting it lacks the genetic fortitude of past killer bugs.

President Barack Obama even voiced hope Friday that it may turn out to be no more harmful than the average seasonal flu.

In New York City, which has the most confirmed swine flu cases in the U.S. with 49, swine flu has not spread far beyond cases linked to one Catholic school. In Mexico, the epicenter of the outbreak, very few relatives of flu victims seem to have caught it.

A flu expert said he sees no reason to believe the virus is particularly lethal. And a federal scientist said the germ's genetic makeup lacks some traits seen in the deadly 1918 flu pandemic strain and the more recent killer bird flu.

Still, it was too soon to be certain what the swine flu virus will do. Experts say the only wise course is to prepare for the worst. But in a world that's been rattled by the specter of a global pandemic, glimmers of hope were more than welcome Friday.

"It may turn out that H1N1 runs its course like ordinary flus, in which case we will have prepared and we won't need all these preparations," Obama said, using the flu's scientific name.

The president stressed the government was still taking the virus very seriously, adding that even if this round turns out to be mild, the bug could return in a deadlier form during the next flu season.

New York officials said after a week of monitoring the disease that the city's outbreak gives little sign of spreading beyond a few pockets or getting more dangerous.

All but two of the city's confirmed cases so far involve people associated with the high school where the local outbreak began and where several students had recently returned from Mexico.

More than 1,000 students, parents and faculty there reported flu symptoms over just a few days last month. But since then, only a handful of new infections have been reported — only eight students since last Sunday.

Almost everyone who became ill before then are either recovering or already well. The school, which was closed this past week, is scheduled to reopen Monday. No new confirmed cases were identified in the city on Friday, and Mayor Michael Bloomberg said the outbreak in New York had so far proved to be "a relatively minor annoyance."

In Mexico, where swine flu has killed at least 16 people and the confirmed case count has surpassed 300, the health secretary said few of the relatives of 86 suspected swine flu patients had caught the virus. Only four of the 219 relatives surveyed turned up as probable cases.

As recently as Wednesday, Mexican authorities said there were 168 suspected swine flu deaths in the country and almost 2,500 suspected cases. The officials have stopped updating that number and say those totals may have even been inflated.

Mexico shut down all but essential government services and private businesses Friday, the start of a five-day shutdown that includes a holiday weekend. Authorities there will use the break to determine whether emergency measures can be eased.

In the Mexican capital, there were no reports of deaths overnight — the first time that has happened since the emergency was declared a week ago, said Mayor Marcelo Ebrard.

"This isn't to say we are lowering our guard or we think we no longer have problems," Ebrard said. "But we're moving in the right direction."

The U.S. case count rose to 155 on Friday, based on federal and state counts, although state laboratory operators believe the number is higher because they are not testing all suspected cases.

Worldwide, the total confirmed cases neared 600, although that number is also believed to be much larger. Besides the U.S. and Mexico, the virus has been detected in Canada, New Zealand, China, Israel and eight European nations.

There were still plenty of signs Friday of worldwide concern.

China decided to suspend flights from Mexico to Shanghai because of a case of swine flu confirmed in a flight from Mexico, China's state-run Xinhua News Agency reported.

And in Hong Kong, hundreds of hotel guests and workers were quarantined after a tourist from Mexico tested positive for swine flu, Asia's first confirmed case.

Evoking the 2003 SARS outbreak, workers in protective suits and masks wiped down tables, floors and windows. Guests at the hotel waved to photographers from their windows.

Scientists looking closely at the H1N1 virus itself have found some encouraging news, said Nancy Cox, flu chief at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Its genetic makeup doesn't show specific traits that showed up in the 1918 pandemic virus, which killed about 40 million to 50 million people worldwide.

"However, we know that there is a great deal that we do not understand about the virulence of the 1918 virus or other influenza viruses" that caused serious illnesses, Cox said. "So we are continuing to learn."

She told The Associated Press that the swine flu virus also lacked genetic traits associated with the virulence of the bird flu virus, which grabbed headlines a few years ago and has killed 250 people, mostly in Asia.

Researchers will get a better idea of how dangerous this virus is over the next week to 10 days, said Peter Palese, a leading flu researcher with Mount Sinai Medical School in New York.

So far in the United States, he said, the virus appears to look and behave like the garden-variety flus that strike every winter. "There is no real reason to believe this is a more serious strain," he said.

Palese said many adults probably have immune systems primed to handle the virus because it is so similar to another common flu strain.

As for why the illness has predominantly affected children and teenagers in New York, Palese said older people probably have more antibodies from exposure to similar types of flu that help them fight off infection.

"The virus is so close," he said.

In the United States, most of the people with swine flu have been treated at home. Only nine people are known to have ended up in the hospital, though officials suspect there are more.

In Mexico, officials have voiced optimism for two days that the worst may be over. But Dr. Scott F. Dowell of the CDC said it's hard to know whether the outbreak is easing up in Mexico. "They're still seeing plenty of cases," Dowell said.

He said outbreaks in any given area might be relatively brief, so that they may seem to be ending in some areas that had a lot of illness a few weeks ago. But cases are occurring elsewhere, and national numbers in Mexico are not abating, he said.

A top Mexican medical officer questioned the World Health Organization's handling of the early signs of the swine flu scare, suggesting Thursday that a regional arm of the WHO had taken too long to notify WHO headquarters of about a unusually late rash of flu cases in Mexico.

The regional agency, however, provided a timeline to the AP suggesting it was Mexico that failed to respond to its request to alert other nations to the first hints of the outbreak.

The Mexican official, chief epidemiologist Dr. Miguel Angel Lezana, backtracked Friday, telling Radio Formula: "There was no delay by the Mexican authorities, nor was there any by the World Health Organization."

In the U.S., Obama said efforts were focused on identifying people who have the flu, getting medical help to the right places and providing clear advice to state and local officials and the public.

The president also said the U.S. government is working to produce a vaccine down the road, developing clear guidelines for school closings and trying to ensure businesses cooperate with workers who run out of sick leave.

He pointed out that regular seasonal flus kill about 36,000 people in the United States in an average year and send 200,000 to the hospital.

___

Associated Press writers Malcolm Ritter in New York, Lauran Neergaard in Washington, and Paul Haven, E. Eduardo Castillo, Andrew O. Selsky and Istra Pacheco in Mexico City contributed to this report.

BlueAngel
05-01-2009, 09:08 PM
layinglow1 wrote:

"Not only does it mutate to infect humans, it also mutates inside our bodies, laying dormant at first, so we seem to get better....then a few weeks to a month later, we get sick again, only THIS time it is fatal. That is why they are dying in Mexico, and not here in the US. The Mexico deaths are the SECOND phase of the illness."

From where have you derived the above information?

How does a virus lay dormant, but then WE seem to get better.

If the virus lays dormant, that means that signs of illness are not present so, therefore, WE wouldn't seem to get better because WE aren't experiencing an illness.

What is the deal with your use of the word "WE?"

You say:

It mutates inside OUR bodies.

WE seem to get better.

WE get sick again.

How do you know the Mexico deaths are the second phase of the illness?

BlueAngel
05-01-2009, 09:14 PM
Some people relish in ATTEMPTING to spread fear.

It's their job.

These people give Conspiracy Theorists a bad name.

They're most probably on the government's PSYOP's payroll.

BlueAngel
05-01-2009, 09:22 PM
"It may turn out that H1N1 runs its course like ordinary flus, in which case we will have prepared and we won't need all these preparations," Obama said.
But "we're taking it seriously," he said. Even if the flu turns out mild now, it could come back in a deadlier form during the normal flu season, he said."


"Even if the flu turns out mild now, it could come back in a deadlier form during the normal flu season......."


------And there you have it....a subtle way of letting it slip, to absolve the govt. of any foreknowledge that it WILL come back, sooner than anyone thinks...and WAY before the "normal flu season."


Thoughts anyone??? :confused:

Obama didn't let anything slip.

He said it matter of fact.

He's helping to spread fear.

Just as you are.

How does what Obama said absolve the government of any foreknowledge that the virus will come back sooner than anyone thinks?

He clearly said it may come back in a deadlier form and last time I checked he is the highest ranking government official.

Well, for all intents and purposes, he appears to be, but, as we know, he is not.

layinglow1
05-01-2009, 11:47 PM
whatever....ugh....

I don't have to do anything to spread fear, the media is doing that well enough on their own. I'm just putting two and two together and coming up with my own theory of what might actually be happening to warrant such a drastic response from our govt. over this whole thing, and also a pretty darn good theory as to why people have died in Mexico, but not here in the US....

What Obama said was subtle in that he said it might get worse, in the NEXT flu season....thereby making it look like the govt. has no idea it will be worse in just a matter of weeks, while still planting that seed into the public's mind....

I never said my "theory" was information! It's the theory I have derived from looking at the facts, as the media has served them up, that don't seem to make sense to me personally. By using OUR and WE, I attempted to present a scenario as I see it possibly unfolding in the coming weeks for US, meaning the United States....

sheesh....

As for not spreading fear, well.....the name of this site is "club conspiracy," so....that means people come on here to talk about all sorts of conspiracy theories, which are A. Only theories, not facts, and B. Most conspiracy theories are not good ones, and are pretty scary to think about, by definition. If you don't want to read a bunch of conspiracy theories that might possibly freak you out or instill fear in your mind, you probably shouldn't be reading anyone's posts on this forum.

Stompk: I'm glad you enjoyed my "thoughts" on the subject. It was nice to receive some positive feedback from one person at least. :)

layinglow1
05-02-2009, 12:13 AM
If the virus lays dormant, that means that signs of illness are not present so, therefore, WE wouldn't seem to get better because WE aren't experiencing an illness.

--The people who get sick with the swine flu do get sick...then get better after a few days, so no big deal. What I'm saying is, at that point, my theory is that the virus has incubated in the person's body (presumably at 101.5 or higher to successfully mutate) then during the time the person seems better, the new strain of the virus rebuilds, or replicates, and launches a second attack, only the second time around the virus is much more virulant, and much more deadly...that is my theory.

What is the deal with your use of the word "WE?"

You say:

It mutates inside OUR bodies.

WE seem to get better.

WE get sick again.

---by WE I mean human beings.

How do you know the Mexico deaths are the second phase of the illness?

because the mexican govt. experienced a spike in flu cases at the end of March....but people didn't start dying until the second week of April....about two-three weeks AFTER the spike...the only way to explain that one, that I could come up with is that the illness resurfaced in the previously thought to be recovered flu victims. It would also explain why the US cases are not dying....yet.....I looked at the news stories, and I pieced together a personal theory about how all this could be happening the way it is, that makes sense to me. I developed a personal theory that the illness that is going around has two phases in its attack in the human body....

How can any conspiracy theory be so "scary" it gives conspiracy theorists a bad name? That is the very definition of conspiracy theories, they are scary!! Most of them are way out there, extremist, not based on real fact or information, or just plain kooky....Some of them are thoughtful and insightful as well. Everyone on here deserves to deliver their theories and thoughts without immediately getting dumped on by what are supposed to be their fellow supporters.

Now, I presented a theory....and asked for people's thoughts. Not their attacks, pessimism and non-productive criticisms. So, once again, I'll ask:

Thoughts anyone??

BlueAngel
05-02-2009, 06:29 AM
"It may turn out that H1N1 runs its course like ordinary flus, in which case we will have prepared and we won't need all these preparations," Obama said.
But "we're taking it seriously," he said. Even if the flu turns out mild now, it could come back in a deadlier form during the normal flu season, he said."


"Even if the flu turns out mild now, it could come back in a deadlier form during the normal flu season......."


------And there you have it....a subtle way of letting it slip, to absolve the govt. of any foreknowledge that it WILL come back, sooner than anyone thinks...and WAY before the "normal flu season."


Thoughts anyone??? :confused:

Yes.

My thought.

Please provide the entire text wherein Obama states as you have defined above in quotes.

layinglow1
05-02-2009, 12:16 PM
seriously? Why would I spend my free time trying to get the entire text of an article for you? So....you don't believe Obama said that, or you think I'm making it up....which one?

Besides, you already said the statement made sense, and that there was nothing subtle about it....

Oh wait, you think the rest of the article disclaims my theory....

??

let me see if I can find the article...if it can be tracked down quickly...

sigh....

layinglow1
05-02-2009, 12:28 PM
here is a new article from today....I have no idea how to track down the article I quoted from yesterday. I don't have the time. But he did say that....and here is what he is saying now...

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. is taking “all necessary precautions” now to be prepared if the swine flu develops into “something worse” in this country, President Barack Obama said Saturday. http://www.rgj.com/gcicommonfiles/sr/graphics/common/adlabel_horz.gif


Swine flu, or H1N1 flu as the government prefers to call it, has caused only one confirmed death in the United States. But medical authorities fear it could become much worse, Obama said in his weekly radio and Internet address, and that’s why he has thrown substantial federal resources into the campaign against it.
“This is a new strain of the flu virus, and because we haven’t developed an immunity to it, it has more potential to cause us harm,” the president said. “Unlike the various strains of animal flu that have emerged in the past, it’s a flu that is spreading from human to human. This creates the potential for a pandemic, which is why we are acting quickly and aggressively.”
The virus, which has claimed far more victims in Mexico than elsewhere, has not proved as potent in the U.S. “We cannot know for certain why that is, which is why we are taking all necessary precautions in the event that the virus does turn into something worse,” he said.
He recapped his administration’s efforts. They include asking schools with confirmed cases of the flu virus to close for up to 14 days; urging employers to let infected workers take all the sick days they need; and reminding Americans to wash their hands often, cover their coughs and stay home if ill.
Obama noted that the flu strain “can be defeated by a course of antiviral treatment that we already have on hand.” One-fourth of the nation’s 50 million courses of the treatment have been distributed to states, he said.
Obama has asked Congress for $1.5 billion to buy more medicine and equipment if needed.
“It is my greatest hope and prayer that all of these precautions and preparations prove unnecessary,” the president said. “I would sooner take action now than hesitate and face graver consequences later.”

BlueAngel
05-02-2009, 06:51 PM
seriously? Why would I spend my free time trying to get the entire text of an article for you? So....you don't believe Obama said that, or you think I'm making it up....which one?

Besides, you already said the statement made sense, and that there was nothing subtle about it....

Oh wait, you think the rest of the article disclaims my theory....

??

let me see if I can find the article...if it can be tracked down quickly...

sigh....

Why not spend your free time presenting the entire text?

You didn't seem to have any problem finding the specific quote.

It must have been contained within a larger text.

Where is the larger text?

You certainly seem to have enough free time to spend on this site presenting fabrications.

I never said the Obama statement you posted made sense.

If he said that which you said he did, I rendered my opinion as to why he would have made the statement.

I said that if he said that which you say he did, he is spreading fear just as you are and that he didn't say it because he wanted to abstain the government from any responsibility because he is the highest ranking government official.

Not really.

But, for all intents and purposes the American people have been brainwashed to believe this.

The statement you claim that he said, was not subtle.

You have not supplied the complete text from where you derived that which you say Obama spoke.

Back up what you claim Obama said.

Otherwise, it will be discarded as false and having been fabricated from your own mind.

While you're at it, please present the relevant information other than from your own mind that speaks to what you propose as FACT that those who died in Mexico from the Swine flu first experienced it as it lay dormant in their bodies; went away; came back and then killed them.

If you can't, we shall dismiss this rubbish, as well.

Sorry that requesting you back-up your fabrications with fact causes you to sigh.

Obviously, this is too daunting a task for you to undertake.

BlueAngel
05-02-2009, 07:11 PM
here is a new article from today....I have no idea how to track down the article I quoted from yesterday. I don't have the time. But he did say that....and here is what he is saying now...

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. is taking “all necessary precautions” now to be prepared if the swine flu develops into “something worse” in this country, President Barack Obama said Saturday. http://www.rgj.com/gcicommonfiles/sr/graphics/common/adlabel_horz.gif


Swine flu, or H1N1 flu as the government prefers to call it, has caused only one confirmed death in the United States. But medical authorities fear it could become much worse, Obama said in his weekly radio and Internet address, and that’s why he has thrown substantial federal resources into the campaign against it.
“This is a new strain of the flu virus, and because we haven’t developed an immunity to it, it has more potential to cause us harm,” the president said. “Unlike the various strains of animal flu that have emerged in the past, it’s a flu that is spreading from human to human. This creates the potential for a pandemic, which is why we are acting quickly and aggressively.”
The virus, which has claimed far more victims in Mexico than elsewhere, has not proved as potent in the U.S. “We cannot know for certain why that is, which is why we are taking all necessary precautions in the event that the virus does turn into something worse,” he said.
He recapped his administration’s efforts. They include asking schools with confirmed cases of the flu virus to close for up to 14 days; urging employers to let infected workers take all the sick days they need; and reminding Americans to wash their hands often, cover their coughs and stay home if ill.
Obama noted that the flu strain “can be defeated by a course of antiviral treatment that we already have on hand.” One-fourth of the nation’s 50 million courses of the treatment have been distributed to states, he said.
Obama has asked Congress for $1.5 billion to buy more medicine and equipment if needed.
“It is my greatest hope and prayer that all of these precautions and preparations prove unnecessary,” the president said. “I would sooner take action now than hesitate and face graver consequences later.”

Obviously, no one knows for certain how deadly this virus can be and this appears to be what Obama is communicating in the text you have provided of his radio address.

From what I have read, some people do have an immunity to it.

This site does not embrace FEAR MONGERS!

If you want to live in a state of FEAR, please do so, but don't attempt to spread it like a virus.

BlueAngel
05-02-2009, 07:36 PM
I'm confused.

This is an excerpt from the article below:

'But experts said there is much they don't know about the outbreak in Mexico, where tests confirmed 16 deaths and nearly 450 people sickened. A multinational team of virus sleuths are trying to piece together the epidemiological puzzle.'

16 deaths in Mexico????

I thought the number was near 200?

Huh?

Clarification requested.

Mexico swine flu deaths ebb - but caution urged (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090502/ap_on_he_me/med_swine_flu)

Mexico swine flu deaths ebb - but caution urged

By ALEXANDRA OLSON, Associated Press Writers

Alexandra Olson, Associated Press Writers –

Sat May 2, 6:00 pm ET

MEXICO CITY – Mexico said a swine flu epidemic appears to be easing, but urged citizens Saturday not to let their guard down against a virus that has killed 17 people and is spreading across Asia and Europe. Experts warned the virus could mutate and come back with a vengeance.

With no suspected swine flu deaths since Wednesday and fewer people turning up at hospitals with virus symptoms, Mexican officials were guardedly optimistic that the worse was over in the outbreak's epicenter. Cases outside Mexico suggested the new swine flu strain is weaker than feared. But governments moved quickly anyway to ban flights and prepare quarantine plans.

The World Health Organization decided against a full pandemic alert, but that doesn't mean people can relax, said Dr. Mike Ryan, WHO's global alert and response director.

"These viruses mutate, these viruses changes, these viruses can further reassort with other genetic material, with other viruses," he said. "So it would be imprudent at this point to take too much reassurance" from the small number of deaths.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also said it's too early to declare victory.

"We have seen times where things appear to be getting better and then get worse again," said Dr. Anne Schuchat, the U.S. agency's interim science and public health deputy director. "I think in Mexico we may be holding our breath for sometime."

The global caseload was 763 and growing — the vast majority in Mexico, the U.S. and Canada. Costa Rica reported its first confirmed swine flu case — the first in Latin America outside Mexico.

Swine flu cases have been confirmed in 18 countries so far — including Europe, the Middle East and the Asia-Pacific region — and experts believe the actual spread is much wider than the numbers suggest.

U.S. President Barack Obama urged caution Saturday.

"This is a new strain of the flu virus, and because we haven't developed an immunity to it, it has more potential to cause us harm," Obama said. Later, he spoke with Mexican President Felipe Calderon for about 20 minutes to share information.

What started as a swine flu outbreak more than a week ago in Mexico quickly ballooned to a global health threat, with the WHO declaring a pandemic was imminent. Now public health officials are having to carefully calibrate their statements. Push the message too far, and they could lose credibility if the virus fizzles out. But if they back off and it suddenly surges, the consequences could be much more dire.

Health Secretary Jose Angel Cordova — who has fended off criticism that his government reacted too slowly at first — dismissed criticism that Mexico later overreacted in ordering a five-day, nationwide shutdown of all nonessential government and private businesses.

"It's absurd to think that Mexico was putting on a show," Cordova said. "I think it's preferable, at a certain moment, to take advanced measures and succeed in containing the problem than to not take them and ask, 'Why didn't we take them?'"

Mexico's last confirmed swine flu death occurred Tuesday, and the last suspected death came Wednesday, said Pablo Kuri, an epidemiologist and adviser to Cordova.

Cordova said hospitals are now handling fewer patients with swine flu symptoms, a sign that the disease at present is not very contagious. Mexican investigators who visited 280 relatives of victims found only 4 had the virus.

But experts said there is much they don't know about the outbreak in Mexico, where tests confirmed 16 deaths and nearly 450 people sickened. A multinational team of virus sleuths are trying to piece together the epidemiological puzzle.

Kuri said three of the dead were children: a 9-year-old girl, a 12-year-old girl and a 13-year-old boy. Four were older than 60.

The other nine were between 21 and 39 — unusual ages for people to die of the flu because they tend to have stronger immune systems.

Although most of the dead were from Mexico City, they came from different neighborhoods in the metropolis of 20 million people, Kuri said. And he said health investigators haven't found any similarities in their medical backgrounds.

One explanation may be that they sought treatment too late — an average of seven days before seeing a doctor. For those who recovered, the average wait was three days, said Hugo Lopez-Gatell Ramirez, deputy director of Mexico's Intelligence Unit for Health Emergencies.

Many of the sick around the world were people who had visited Mexico, including 13 of Britain's 15 cases.

China sealed 305 people inside a Hong Kong hotel where an infected Mexican tourist stayed.

South Korea reported Asia's second confirmed case — a woman just back from Mexico — and other governments prepared to quarantine airline passengers, eager to show how they have learned from the deadly SARS epidemic in 2003, when Hong Kong was criticized for imposing quarantines too slowly.

With the disease on its doorstep, China suspended all direct flights from Mexico. Health workers in white bodysuits patrolled the lobby of the sealed Metropark Hotel where the 25-year-old Mexican stayed before he became Asia's first confirmed case late Friday.

Mexican Foreign Minister Patricia Espinosa complained that China had isolated 71 Mexican nationals in six cities, including Beijing, without reason — and urged Mexicans not to travel to China until the situation was resolved.

"These are discriminatory measures," she said.

Governments must act cautiously, said Michael Osterholm, an infectious disease specialist at the University of Minnesota who has advised the U.S. government on flu preparations.

"This is a flu virus acting like a flu virus and causing, at worst, mild to moderate influenza," he said. "We have no room for complacency here, but we have to have a proportional response. What are the risks at the immediate time?"

___

Associated Press writers David B. Caruso and Malcolm Ritter in New York, Lauran Neergaard in Washington and Paul Haven and Juan Carlos Llorca in Mexico City contributed to this report.


------------------------------------------------------------------

I'm confused.

The following is an excerpt from the above article:

'But experts said there is much they don't know about the outbreak in Mexico, where tests confirmed 16 deaths and nearly 450 people sickened. A multinational team of virus sleuths are trying to piece together the epidemiological puzzle.'

16 deaths in Mexico????

I thought the number was near 200?

Huh?

Clarification requested.

BlueAngel
05-02-2009, 08:04 PM
This is rubbish.

I'm certain the Mexican death toll from the Swine Flu was reported to be nearly 200 and now it's at 19.

Mexican swine flu death toll rises to 19 (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090503/ap_on_re_la_am_ca/med_swine_flu)

Mexican swine flu death toll rises to 19

AP – 6 mins ago

MEXICO CITY – Mexico's health secretary says the number of confirmed swine flu cases has risen to 473, including 19 people who died.

The previous confirmed death toll was 16.

Jose Angel Cordova is urging citizens not to let their guard down against a virus that has killed a total of 20 people and is spreading across Asia and Europe. Experts warned the virus could mutate and come back with a vengeance.

Cordova spoke at a news conference Saturday.

Cases outside Mexico suggest the new swine flu strain is weaker than feared. But governments moved quickly anyway to ban flights and prepare quarantine plans.

(This version CORRECTS Corrects in graf 3 total deaths to 20 instead of 16. Moving on general news and financial services.)

------------------------------------------------------------------

Sorry, but the previously reported Mexican deaths due to Swine flu was near 200 and now it's at 19.

Correct me, if I'm wrong.

BlueAngel
05-02-2009, 08:07 PM
Here, an excerpt from text on this thread:

"Mexico, the outbreak's epicenter with up to 86 suspected deaths, canceled some church services and closed markets, restaurants and movie theaters. A televised variety show filled its seats with cardboard cutouts. Few people ventured onto the streets, and some wore face masks."

Another excerpt from this thread:

"168 deaths in Mexico.

One death in the US and it was a Mexican child who was brought to the US by his/her mother for medical care.

Most of the "FLU" reported cases on this map for countries other than Mexico, indicate "probable" and/or "suspected" cases."

Apparently, the death toll in Mexico from the Swine Flu has now dwindled to 19.

BlueAngel
05-02-2009, 08:31 PM
Okay, I've figured it out.

The death toll of 19 refers only to Mexico City and not Mexico as a whole.

All one has to do is click on the map that our member, Stompk, who referred to me as a psyops pedophile, has provided to view the total death count in Mexico which is near the 200 mark.

Must say, however, that the articles by the AP are not very helpful when they report the death count at 19 in Mexico when they are referring only to Mexico City.

BlueAngel
05-02-2009, 08:50 PM
Here's a suggestion to the AP writers.

Don't title your article, Mexican death toll from the Swine Flu at 19, if you're only referring to Mexico City.

More appropriately would be:

Mexico City death toll at 19.

layinglow1
05-03-2009, 11:05 AM
So I was right, you are accusing me of making up that Obama quote. Well, I didn't make it up, but oh well. It came from a yahoo news article, but why squabble about tiny details?

Once again you are accusing me of trying to say my theory is fact, which I never said it was. It was a theory....you do understand the definition of a theory, don't you?

This is exactly why I avoid forums for the most part. There is always a thorn-in-your-side person on every forum who only argues and throws jabs at other people. I mean, really, my very first post on this forum, and I immediately have to deal with a pain-in-the-ass person, who is probably a troll. I wonder if other people on this site are having the same problems with you? Probably they are....ugh.

Blue Angel, I am not a fear monger....I am not trying to spread fear, but as I've already stated, this is a site for conspiracy theories, so if you are looking for facts, you are on the wrong forum. It's a place for ideas, theories, and yes, even fabrications, which is the definition of a conspiracy theory. If it could be proven with facts, it would no longer be a conspiracy theory, but a proven phenomenon....

You are an ass....and I'm sure you will have plenty to say in response to this post, but rest assured, I won't be reading it. I will never log onto this site ever again. Enjoy getting in the last words, that I will never even read or know exist.

If the administrators ever read this, please know that you lost a new member, only days after I joined, because of this useless poster who annoyed me so much, I decided your forum was just not worth the aggravation.

Way to go Blue Angel, enjoy your reign over this forum.....

I will only share my theories with my close friends and family, so maybe they will have a fighting chance at a heads up, before things possibly get really bad. Everyone on this forum, however, won't benefit from productive debate and conversation over what we could have done to protect ourselves or prepare in the chance that my theory is even remotely right. You stole any chance of that ever happening.

Seriously, way to go....no one else was frightened by my post but you....you must wonder why that is? Perhaps you don't want to consider if I could be right, because that would be too scary to deal with....?

Enjoy your little forum.......

BlueAngel
05-03-2009, 03:09 PM
So I was right, you are accusing me of making up that Obama quote. Well, I didn't make it up, but oh well. It came from a yahoo news article, but why squabble about tiny details?

You need to supply the source, otherwise it appears you made it up.

Once again you are accusing me of trying to say my theory is fact, which I never said it was. It was a theory....you do understand the definition of a theory, don't you?

You stated that those persons in Mexico who died from SWINE flu, first had the flu in a dormant stage and then it killed them when it came out of it's dormancy in the second stage.

Again, supply the source. Otherwise, it appears you made this up, too.

It is ridiculous for you to think that what you are saying should even be considered as a theory.

This is exactly why I avoid forums for the most part. There is always a thorn-in-your-side person on every forum who only argues and throws jabs at other people. I mean, really, my very first post on this forum, and I immediately have to deal with a pain-in-the-ass person, who is probably a troll. I wonder if other people on this site are having the same problems with you? Probably they are....ugh.

If you think EVERYONE on a forum should agree with you, it's best that you avoid them.

Yeah, I'm a troll because I question your theories.

Blue Angel, I am not a fear monger....I am not trying to spread fear, but as I've already stated, this is a site for conspiracy theories, so if you are looking for facts, you are on the wrong forum. It's a place for ideas, theories, and yes, even fabrications, which is the definition of a conspiracy theory. If it could be proven with facts, it would no longer be a conspiracy theory, but a proven phenomenon....

WE don't need you to explain to US what this forum represents.

A conspiracy theory is not derived from the fabrication of one's mind.

A conspiracy theory involves the mass accumulation of evidence which explains a historical or current event as the result of a secret plot by conspirators, such as a "secret team" or "shadow government."

You are an ass....and I'm sure you will have plenty to say in response to this post, but rest assured, I won't be reading it. I will never log onto this site ever again. Enjoy getting in the last words, that I will never even read or know exist.

If the administrators ever read this, please know that you lost a new member, only days after I joined, because of this useless poster who annoyed me so much, I decided your forum was just not worth the aggravation.

If you're going to toss out your OWN theories of a conspiracy regarding the SWINE flu, you certainly should be able to debate them when they are challenged.

Way to go Blue Angel, enjoy your reign over this forum.....

I will.

I will only share my theories with my close friends and family, so maybe they will have a fighting chance at a heads up, before things possibly get really bad. Everyone on this forum, however, won't benefit from productive debate and conversation over what we could have done to protect ourselves or prepare in the chance that my theory is even remotely right. You stole any chance of that ever happening.

Oh, please. Like I'm stopping you from sharing VITAL information. That's your choice.

Seriously, way to go....no one else was frightened by my post but you....you must wonder why that is? Perhaps you don't want to consider if I could be right, because that would be too scary to deal with....?

Enjoy your little forum.......

Who said I was frightened? You posted YOUR theory about the SWINE flu and I questioned it.

You don't need to get your feathers in a ruffle.

EVERYONE who is a member of this forum is entitled to question ANYTHING that is posted by another member.

Inside the box.

BlueAngel
05-03-2009, 08:17 PM
Well, I assume the map that Stompk provided is inaccurate because here we go again.

Excerpt from the following article:

"Mexican Health Secretary Jose Angel Cordova said late Sunday that the virus that has killed 22 people in Mexico, raising the toll from 19. The last confirmed death occurred on April 29, he said."

New swine flu cases in Europe, US, Latin America (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090504/ap_on_re_la_am_ca/med_swine_flu)

New swine flu cases in Europe, US, Latin America

By JAMES ANDERSON, Associated Press Writer James Anderson,
Associated Press Writer – 4 mins ago

MEXICO CITY – The swine flu epidemic spread deeper into the United States, Europe and Latin America — and in Canada, back to pigs — even as Mexico's health chief hinted Sunday it may soon be time to reopen businesses and schools in the nation where the outbreak likely began.

The virus spread to Colombia in the first confirmed case in South America, worrisome because flu season is about to begin in the Southern Hemisphere. More cases were confirmed in Europe and North America; health officials said at least 999 people have been sickened worldwide.

Dr. Richard Besser, acting chief of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said swine flu is spreading just as easily as regular winter flu.

"The good news is when we look at this virus right now, we're not seeing some of the things in the virus that have been associated in the past with more severe flu," Besser said. "That's encouraging, but it doesn't mean we're out of the woods yet."

On Sunday, health officials raised the number of confirmed U.S. swine flu cases to 244 in 34 states. The new number, up from 160 on Saturday, reflects streamlining in federal procedures and the results of tests by states, which have only recently begun confirming cases, said Dr. Anne Schuchat of the CDC.

Mexican Health Secretary Jose Angel Cordova said late Sunday that the virus that has killed 22 people in Mexico, raising the toll from 19. The last confirmed death occurred on April 29, he said.

Cordova added that the virus had sickened at least 568 and apparently peaked in Mexico between April 23 and April 28. A drastic nationwide shutdown appears to have helped prevent the outbreak from becoming more serious, he said.

"The evolution of the epidemic is now in its declining phase," Cordova said.

He said officials would decide Monday whether to extend the shutdown or allow schools and businesses to reopen on Wednesday.

Pablo Kuri, an epidemiologist advising Cordova, told The Associated Press on Sunday that tests have confirmed a swine flu death in Mexico City on April 11, two days earlier than what had been believed to be the first death.

Kuri also said there have been no deaths among health care workers treating swine flu patients in Mexico, an indication that the virus may not be as contagious or virulent as initially feared.

The closed events made for a surreal Sunday in Mexico, as parishioners celebrated Mass via television, camera operators were the only ones in stadium bleachers and parks, museums, restaurants, theaters and other attractions were closed.

Sunday also marked the official start of campaigning for July 5 congressional elections — but all public campaigning was banned to prevent gatherings where the virus could spread.

Gabriela Cuevas Barron of the conservative National Action Party giddily claimed she was launching Mexico's first virtual campaign, promising in a Webcast to work for a cleaner and safer Mexico City — for now, through Twitter, Facebook and YouTube. Meanwhile, the leftist Democratic Revolution Party was already up with a Facebook page for its candidates.

The United States said it had sent 100,000 protection kits worth $1 million to Mexico for use by first responders. The kits include respiratory masks, protective goggles and overalls. In all, the U.S. has sent $16 million in aid to Mexico since the emergency began, the U.S. Embassy said.

Officials in New Mexico announced Sunday that 14 schools in four towns were being closed for at least a week after the state's first swine flu case was confirmed, and the New Mexico Activities Association suspended all athletic and activity programs until further notice at member schools across the state.

In Arizona, all 10 public schools in the border city of Nogales canceled classes this week after a student tested positive for swine flu.

California officials, meanwhile, suspended all visitations at prisons pending results of tests on an ill inmate at Centinela State Prison.

In the Canadian province of Alberta, officials quarantined about 220 pigs that became infected from a worker who had recently returned from Mexico. It was the first documented case of the H1N1 virus being passed from a human to another species. Canada stressed that pigs often get the flu and there's no danger in eating pork.

Egypt has ordered all pigs in the country slaughtered as a precaution, sparking riots Sunday by pig farmers who threw stones at police.

According to tallies by the CDC, World Health Organization and governments, there were 101 confirmed cases of swine flu in Canada; 40 in Spain; 18 in Britain; eight in Germany; four in New Zealand; two each in Italy, France, Israel, and South Korea; one each in Colombia, Costa Rica, Ireland, Switzerland, Austria, Hong Kong, Denmark and the Netherlands.

Fear spread in other parts of the globe, much of it directed at Mexican nationals or those who have traveled to Mexico.

China quarantined more than 70 Mexican travelers in hospitals and hotels there, and Mexicans on arriving flights were being taken into isolation, said Mexico's ambassador, Jorge Guajardo. Even the Mexican consul in Guangzhou was briefly held after returning from a vacation in Cambodia, Guajardo said.

"In many cases we have gotten reports that they were being quarantined for the sole fact that they had a Mexican passport, whether or not they came from Mexico, whether or not they had been in Mexico, whether or not they had been in contact with someone else from Mexico," Guajardo said.

Hong Kong isolated 350 people in a hotel after a Mexican traveler there was determined to have the swine flu.

In Trinidad, crew aboard a Mexican tanker had been isolated since Friday at the Point Lisas Port. The Ministry of Health said Sunday they were tested and cleared of any flu infection and that the vessel was expected to be released.

Health officials around the world cautioned that despite encouraging signs, swine flu still poses a very real threat.

"Most experts would agree that the current outbreak that we are experiencing is mild to moderate in severity," Dr. Jon Andrus of the Pan American Health Organization said in a teleconference from Washington. "That is not to say that things cannot change very rapidly and very dramatically."

Under one scenario, the virus could peter out now, only to roar back in the fall when flu seasons begins. That's why health officials are watching the Southern Hemisphere so closely.

"Certainly, maybe, this current round of activity has peaked, but we are only 10 days into this outbreak," WHO spokesman Gregory Hartl told reporters in Switzerland. "I think we would want to wait a while before making a definitive decision."

___

Associated Press writers contributing to this report included Christopher Bodeen in Beijing, Bradley S. Klapper in Zurich and Alexandra Olson, Paul Haven and E. Eduardo Castillo in Mexico City.

BlueAngel
05-07-2009, 11:32 PM
The WHO reports that 2 billion people could be infected by the SWINE virus over the next couple of years, but they won't show any symptoms.

Huh?

No symptoms, but they're infected!?!

Sorry, but you can't have an INFECTION and not know it.

An infection indicates symptoms!

Excerpt:

"I don't think the 2 billion figure should scare people because it's not as though 2 billion people are going to die. The prediction from WHO is that 2 billion people might catch it. Half of those people won't show any symptoms. Or if they show any symptoms, they will be so mild they will hardly know they've had it."

Gee.

Maybe we should all start wearing face masks to protect ourselves from becomming infected with the Swine flu because, afterall, if we do become infected with the Swine flu, according to the WHO, we probably won't show any signs of being infected and/or if we do show symptoms, they'll be so slight, we won't even know we're infected.

HUH!?!

Yeah.

Makes perfect sense.

WHO: Up to 2 billion people might get swine flu (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090508/ap_on_he_me/med_swine_flu)

WHO: Up to 2 billion people might get swine flu

AP – By ALEXANDER G. HIGGINS and ELIANE ENGELER,
Associated Press Writers Alexander G. Higgins And Eliane Engeler,
Associated Press Writers – Thu May 7, 9:22 pm ET

GENEVA – Up to 2 billion people could be infected by swine flu if the current outbreak turns into a pandemic lasting two years, the World Health Organization said Thursday. WHO flu chief Keiji Fukuda said the historical record of flu pandemics indicates one-third of the world's population gets infected in such outbreaks. Independent experts agreed that the estimate was possible but pointed out that many would not show any symptoms.

In Mexico, the hardest hit country so far, high schools and universities opened for the first time in two weeks as the government's top health official insisted the epidemic is on the decline. All students were checked for swine flu symptoms and some were sent home.

"If we do move into a pandemic, then our expectation is that we will see a large number of people infected worldwide," Fukuda said. "If you look at past pandemics, it would be a reasonable estimate to say perhaps a third of the world's population would get infected with this virus."

With the current total population of more than 6 billion, that would mean an infection total of 2 billion, he said, but added that the world has changed since pandemics of earlier generations, and experts are unable to predict if the impact will be greater or smaller.

"We don't really know." said Fukuda. "This is a benchmark from the past. Please do not interpret this as a prediction for the future."

Chris Smith, at flu virologist at Cambridge University in England, said the 2 billion estimate was possible.

"That doesn't sound too outlandish to me for the simple reason that this is a very infectious virus," Smith told The Associated Press. "You're talking about a virus that no one in the population has seen before and therefore everyone is immunologically vulnerable. Therefore it's highly likely that once it starts to spread, people will catch it. And since the majority of the world's population are in contact with one another, you're going to get quite a lot of spread."

John Oxford, professor of virology at St. Bart's and Royal London Hospital, agreed.

"I don't think the 2 billion figure should scare people because it's not as though 2 billion people are going to die. The prediction from WHO is that 2 billion people might catch it. Half of those people won't show any symptoms. Or if they show any symptoms, they will be so mild they will hardly know they've had it."

Fukuda said it also is impossible to say if the current strain of swine flu will become severe or mild, but that even with a mild flu, "from the global perspective there are still very large numbers of people who could develop pneumonia, require respirators, who could die."

A mild outbreak in wealthier countries can be "quite severe in its impact in the developing world," Fukuda said.

People react differently to the flu depending on their general state of health and other factors, he said. Some younger people in the Southern Hemisphere may be more vulnerable because of poor diet, war, HIV infections and other factors.

"We expect this kind of event to unfold over weeks and months," Fukuda said. "Really if you look over a two-year period that is really the period in which you see an increase in the number of illnesses and deaths during a pandemic influenza."

So far the swine flu virus has spread to 26 countries. Brazil and Argentina on Thursday became the second and third countries in South America to announce confirmed cases.

Mexican dance halls, movie theaters and bars were allowed to fully reopen Thursday after a five-day shutdown designed to curb the virus' spread. Businesses must screen for any sick customers, and restaurant employees must wear surgical masks.

Fans can attend professional soccer matches this weekend after all were played in empty stadiums last weekend.

Mexico confirmed two more deaths, for a total of 44, while 1,160 people have been sickened, up 90 from Wednesday. Despite death tolls and confirmed caseloads that rise daily, Health Secretary Jose Angel Cordova insisted the epidemic is waning in Mexico.

WHO raised its global total of laboratory-confirmed cases to 2,099, from 1,893 late Wednesday, and said swine flu also has caused two deaths in the United States.

This swine flu seems to have a long incubation period — five to seven days before people notice symptoms, according to Dr. Marc-Alain Widdowson, a medical epidemiologist from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now tracking the flu in Mexico City. That means the virus can keep being spread by people who won't know to stay home.

Laughing and joking, high school students gathered at the entrance of the National School of Graphic Arts in Mexico City, waiting to fill out forms that asked about their health.

Of 280 students entering the school in the first 20 minutes, two showed symptoms of swine flu, including coughing and nasal congestion, said assistant principal Ana Maria Calvo Vega. Their parents were notified and they won't be readmitted without a statement from a doctor saying they don't have the virus, she said.

Students at a Mexico City vocational high school were welcomed with a hand sanitizer and a surgical mask. Joyful to see each other again, students embraced and kissed — some through masks.

But some worried that the virus could surge back once young people gather in groups again.

"My 17-year-old daughter is afraid. She knows she must go back but doesn't want to," said Silvia Mendez as she walked with her 4-year-old son, Enrique, in San Miguel Topilejo, a town perched in forested mountains near the capital.

Working parents have struggled to provide child care during the shutdown. It forced many to stay home from work, bring their youngsters to their jobs, or leave them at home.

Each school, Mexican officials said, had to be cleaned and inspected this week. Complicating the task: Many schools are primitive buildings with dirt floors and lack proper bathrooms. It was unclear how students attending those schools could adhere to the government's strict sanitary conditions.

The government promised detergent, chlorine, trash bags, anti-bacterial soap or antiseptic gel and face masks to state governments for delivery to public schools. But some local districts apparently didn't get the word.

U.S. health officials are no longer recommending that schools close because of suspected swine flu cases since the virus has turned out to be milder than initially feared. But many U.S. schools have done so anyway, including the school of a Texas teacher who died.

In Asia, top health officials said the region must remain vigilant over the threat of swine flu, stepping up cooperation to produce vaccines and bolstering meager anti-viral stockpiles.

The virus has so far largely spared Asia. Only South Korea and Hong Kong have confirmed cases. On Thursday, China and Hong Kong released dozens of people quarantined over suspected contact with one of the region's few swine flu carriers.

Experience has been the spur to WHO to make sure the world is as prepared as possible for a pandemic, which would be indicated by a rise to phase 6 from the current phase 5 in the agency's alert scale. That would mean general spread of the disease in another region beyond North America, where the outbreak so far has been heaviest.

"I'm not quite sure we know if we're going to phase six or not or when we would do so," Fukuda said. "It's really impossible for anybody to predict right now."

Officials said the agency was likely to shorten its annual meeting of its 193 member states later this month from 10 days to five because of the outbreak, which it was scheduled to discuss.

"That is under consideration," Fukuda said. "Sure it is possible."

____

Contributions from AP Medical Writer Maria Cheng in London and Associated Press writers Andrew O. Selsky in Mexico City and Michael Casey in Bangkok.

stompk
05-08-2009, 06:18 AM
David Batty
guardian.co.uk, Friday 8 May 2009 12.58 BST

British scientists crack swine flu code as world tally rises to 2,384

• Mapping of virus's genetic code will aid creation of vaccine
• Mexico worst affected, with 1,112 cases and 42 deaths

British scientists crack swine flu code as world tally rises to 2,384 | World news | guardian.co.uk (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/may/08/swine-flu-genetic-code-tally)

This thing is just getting started. It's amazing how easily the wool is pulled over the
sheeps eyes.

stompk
05-08-2009, 06:24 AM
When I started this thread, about two weeks ago, there were about 100 cases

In 2 week, the flu spread by 20 fold

That means, at that rate of spread, in a month from now, there will be around 200,000 cases

2 months, 20,000,000. It's growing at an exponential rate because it is very contagious.

BlueAngel
05-09-2009, 10:31 PM
Bump.

BlueAngel
05-10-2009, 12:44 AM
British scientists crack swine flu code as world tally rises to 2,384 | World news | guardian.co.uk (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/may/08/swine-flu-genetic-code-tally)

This thing is just getting started. It's amazing how easily the wool is pulled over the
sheeps eyes.

Yeah.

Truly amazing.

Those damn stupid sheeple.

If they didn't have the wool pulled over their eyes, the Swine flu wouldn't exist.

Those gosh darn, Sheeple.

It's all their fault.

If only they would remove the wool from their eyes and wake up, they could stop the spread of the Swine flu.

Damn, stupid Sheeple.

The Swine flu is all their fault.

BlueAngel
05-10-2009, 12:57 AM
When I started this thread, about two weeks ago, there were about 100 cases

In 2 week, the flu spread by 20 fold

That means, at that rate of spread, in a month from now, there will be around 200,000 cases

2 months, 20,000,000. It's growing at an exponential rate because it is very contagious.

On this day, May 9, 2009, there are 4,150 confirmed cases of the Swine flu in 29 countries.

You predict 200,000 cased by June 9th and 20,000,000 by July 9th.

Developments on swine flu worldwide (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/med_swine_flu_glance)

Developments on swine flu worldwide

By The Associated Press
The Associated Press – Sat May 9, 11:24 pm ET

Key developments on swine flu outbreaks, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the World Health Organization and government officials:

_Deaths: A global total of 53 — 48 in Mexico; three in the U.S.; one in Canada and one in Costa Rica. One of those who died in the U.S. was a toddler from Mexico. Officials said the Canadian, U.S. and Costa Rican victims also had other underlying medical conditions.

_Confirmed cases: more than 4,150 in 29 countries, including at least 1,626 in Mexico, at least 2,254 in the United States and 281 in Canada.

_Washington state health officials say a man in his 30s is the first person in the state to die from what appears to be complications of swine flu. The man, in his 30s with underlying heart conditions, died last week.

_Japan reported its first four cases: a teacher and three students who had been on a high school trip to Canada and are now ill.

_Canadian officials said Saturday that almost 500 hogs quarantined on an Alberta farm after they were diagnosed with swine flu have been culled because of overcrowding.

_Japan reported its first three cases Saturday, an airport quarantine official told The Associated Press. Public broadcaster NHK said the two teenage boys and a teacher were returning from Canada. Australia reported its first confirmed case Saturday.

_President Barack Obama sought to reassure Hispanics that swine flu won't lead to epidemic of discrimination in the United States just because Mexico has been the center of the outbreak.

_Mexico's U.N. envoy says nations need common rules for responding to flu outbreaks to prevent discrimination and unfair trade restrictions; says Mexicans unfairly singled out.

_WHO says up to 2 billion people could be infected by swine flu if outbreak turns into pandemic over months or years. But WHO flu chief Keiji Fukuda says it's too early to tell how widespread or severe the outbreak will become.

_High schools, universities, dance halls, movie theaters and bars have reopened across Mexico. Primary schools will reopen next week.

_About one in 10 Americans have stopped hugging and kissing close friends or relatives because of concerns about swine flu, according to a Harvard study.

_CDC says only about 10 percent of Americans with swine flu are believed to have gotten it during trips to Mexico.

___

On the Net:

CDC: CDC H1N1 Flu (http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu)

WHO: WHO | Influenza A(H1N1) - update 23 (http://tinyurl.com/och3eq)

BlueAngel
05-10-2009, 01:14 AM
As you've noticed, I provide links in my posts and the text of the link, as well.

Odd.

Page through this thread.

Click on one of the links I provided and see for yourself that the text you are reading does not match the text that I provided to the link in my original post.

stompk
05-10-2009, 07:52 AM
As you've noticed, I provide links in my posts and the text of the link, as well.

Odd.

Page through this thread.

Click on one of the links I provided and see for yourself that the text you are reading does not match the text that I provided to the link in my original post.

Hmm, could it be there is truth in my exposing this grand conspiracy.
Words, thoughts and ideas are being changed every day to cover for
the lies.

BlueAngel
05-11-2009, 09:27 PM
Hmm, could it be there is truth in my exposing this grand conspiracy.
Words, thoughts and ideas are being changed every day to cover for
the lies.

I don't think it has anything to do with you.

What exactly is the grand conspiracy that you exposed?

BlueAngel
05-11-2009, 11:13 PM
Please tell me where it was ever stated before this current article that the Swine flu was a HIGHLY unusual mix of BIRD, flu and human viruses.

What happened to the PIG?

Excerpt:

"Because the new swine flu virus -- technically called H1N1 -- is a highly unusual genetic mix of bird, flu and human viruses, health officials worry that it could continue to mutate and return in a more virulent form for next winter's flu season."

CDC Shifts Swine Flu Focus to Likely Impact in the Fall (http://news.yahoo.com/s/hsn/cdcshiftsswineflufocustolikelyimpactinthefall)

Print By Steven Reinberg

HealthDay Reporter by Steven Reinberg

healthday Reporter – 1 hr 16 mins ago

MONDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- As the swine flu continues to spread across the United States -- and most cases continue to be mild -- federal health officials said Monday that they're shifting their focus from individual cases of infection to trying to project what is likely to occur with the virus in the fall.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is conducting field studies to "strengthen our knowledge about how this new virus is spreading, who is most at risk for illness, how effective prevention measures are, antiviral treatment and so forth," Dr. Anne Schuchat, the CDC's interim deputy director for science and public health program, said during an afternoon teleconference.

The CDC is concerned with what will happen as this new virus moves into the Southern Hemisphere, where the flu season is about to start. The CDC is also preparing for the virus' likely return in the fall to the Northern Hemisphere, Schuchat said.

Because the new swine flu virus -- technically called H1N1 -- is a highly unusual genetic mix of bird, flu and human viruses, health officials worry that it could continue to mutate and return in a more virulent form for next winter's flu season.

As of Monday, there were slightly more than 2,600 confirmed cases in 43 states and the District of Columbia, with three confirmed deaths and 94 people hospitalized, Schuchat said. All three patients who have died had underlying health problems before their infection with the flu. Some states do not report data over the weekend, so the number of new cases is likely to rise dramatically tomorrow, she said.

Schuchat added that the confirmed cases are likely just the tip of the iceberg. Many people who become ill don't seek medical attention and are never tested for this strain of flu. "The numbers we are reporting are a minority of the actual infections that are occurring in the country," she said.

The United States has now surpassed Mexico -- believed to be the source of the outbreak -- as the country most affected by the outbreak, the World Health Organization said Monday. The agency was reporting 4,694 confirmed cases of swine flu in 30 countries, with Canada, Spain and the United Kingdom having the most cases outside of the United States and Mexico.

While the swine flu is similar to seasonal flu, there are some important differences, Dr. Richard Besser, the CDC's acting director, said last week. "One thing we are seeing, unlike seasonal flu, a higher percentage seem to be having vomiting and diarrhea," he said.

Besser said most new cases of swine flu in the United States were now caused by person-to-person transmission and not some link to Mexico, as was the case when the outbreak began more than two weeks ago.

Testing has found that the swine flu virus remains susceptible to two common antiviral drugs, Tamiflu and Relenza, according to the CDC.

Meanwhile in Mexico, the country continued to emerge from a virtual shutdown designed to limit infections. High schools, universities, dance halls, movie theaters and bars have reopened, and primary schools were to reopen this week, the Associated Press reported.

U.S. Human Cases of H1N1 Flu Infection

(As of May 11, 2009, 11:00 AM ET)

States

# of laboratory confirmed cases

Alabama 4
Arizona 182
California 191
Colorado 39
Connecticut 24
Delaware 44
Florida 54
Georgia 3
Hawaii 6
Idaho 1
Illinois 487
Indiana 39
Iowa 43
Kansas 36
Kentucky** 10
Louisiana 9
Maine 4
Maryland 23
Massachusetts 88
Michigan 130
Minnesota 7
Missouri 14
Nebraska 13
Nevada 9
New Hampshire 4
New Jersey 7
New Mexico 30
New York 190
North Carolina 11
Ohio 6
Oklahoma 14
Oregon 17
Pennsylvania 10
Rhode Island 7
South Carolina 32
South Dakota 1
Tennessee 54
Texas 179 2
Utah 63
Vermont 1
Virginia 16
Washington 128 1
Washington, D.C. 4
Wisconsin 384

TOTAL*(44) 2618 cases

3 deaths

*includes the District of Columbia

**One case is resident of Ky. but currently hospitalized in Ga.

Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

More information

For more on swine flu, visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

BlueAngel
05-11-2009, 11:21 PM
When did the Swine Flu become a highly unusual mix of Bird, flu and human viruses?

What happened to the PIG?

When did the BIRD appear into the mixture?

In this article?

stompk
05-12-2009, 06:40 AM
Some 5,251 people have been infected in 30 countries, according to WHO's tally on Tuesday, which includes 61 deaths. Hardest hit are Mexico with 2,059 cases, including 56 deaths, and the United States with 2,600 cases including three deaths.

New virus could still mutate, spark pandemic: WHO (http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20090512/wl_nm/us_flu_who_severity_2)

In four days, global cases have doubled.

BlueAngel
05-12-2009, 02:24 PM
Do you think that the IMPORTANT people of the world have been innoculated against what some believe to be a biologically manufactured flu?

:D

Darth Cacodaemon
05-12-2009, 03:19 PM
Do you think that the IMPORTANT people of the world have been innoculated against what some believe to be a biologically manufactured flu?

:D

BlueAngel...? I think you need to relax. Remember, it is all just in your deluded, paranoia filled brain. Swine Flue is natural .

Please, Dear, call a doctor. Your getting sicker.

Darth Cacodaemon
05-12-2009, 03:21 PM
On this day, May 9, 2009, there are 4,150 confirmed cases of the Swine flu in 29 countries.

You predict 200,000 cased by June 9th and 20,000,000 by July 9th.

Developments on swine flu worldwide (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/med_swine_flu_glance)

Developments on swine flu worldwide

By The Associated Press
The Associated Press – Sat May 9, 11:24 pm ET

Key developments on swine flu outbreaks, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the World Health Organization and government officials:

_Deaths: A global total of 53 — 48 in Mexico; three in the U.S.; one in Canada and one in Costa Rica. One of those who died in the U.S. was a toddler from Mexico. Officials said the Canadian, U.S. and Costa Rican victims also had other underlying medical conditions.

_Confirmed cases: more than 4,150 in 29 countries, including at least 1,626 in Mexico, at least 2,254 in the United States and 281 in Canada.

_Washington state health officials say a man in his 30s is the first person in the state to die from what appears to be complications of swine flu. The man, in his 30s with underlying heart conditions, died last week.

_Japan reported its first four cases: a teacher and three students who had been on a high school trip to Canada and are now ill.

_Canadian officials said Saturday that almost 500 hogs quarantined on an Alberta farm after they were diagnosed with swine flu have been culled because of overcrowding.

_Japan reported its first three cases Saturday, an airport quarantine official told The Associated Press. Public broadcaster NHK said the two teenage boys and a teacher were returning from Canada. Australia reported its first confirmed case Saturday.

_President Barack Obama sought to reassure Hispanics that swine flu won't lead to epidemic of discrimination in the United States just because Mexico has been the center of the outbreak.

_Mexico's U.N. envoy says nations need common rules for responding to flu outbreaks to prevent discrimination and unfair trade restrictions; says Mexicans unfairly singled out.

_WHO says up to 2 billion people could be infected by swine flu if outbreak turns into pandemic over months or years. But WHO flu chief Keiji Fukuda says it's too early to tell how widespread or severe the outbreak will become.

_High schools, universities, dance halls, movie theaters and bars have reopened across Mexico. Primary schools will reopen next week.

_About one in 10 Americans have stopped hugging and kissing close friends or relatives because of concerns about swine flu, according to a Harvard study.

_CDC says only about 10 percent of Americans with swine flu are believed to have gotten it during trips to Mexico.

___

On the Net:

CDC: CDC H1N1 Flu (http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu)

WHO: WHO | Influenza A(H1N1) - update 23 (http://tinyurl.com/och3eq)


OMG!!!
SUIT UP FUNDEMENTALIST RELIGIOUS FANATICS!!! JESUS IS RETURNING AND BOY IS HE PISSED!!

Redman811
05-15-2009, 02:53 AM
In the past the vaccine was proven more deadly than the virus, so to hell with that. I don't think the swine flu is natural as it contains swine, bird, and human virus mixture and seems to have originated from Mexico rather than Asia as most flu virus do. Bottom line, It has killed 3 i guess in America. On a more important note, a friend informed me that the car virus kills an average of 117 people a day. The cure... Don't drive!!!

stompk
05-16-2009, 06:32 AM
FRIDAY, May 15 (HealthDay News) -- While the official tally of confirmed U.S. swine flu cases topped 4,700 on Friday, experts at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now estimate the true number of infections at more than 100,000 nationwide.

Also on Friday, health officials announced two new deaths linked to the H1N1 virus, bringing the nationwide total to five

Welcome to AJC! | ajc.com (http://www.ajc.com/health/content/shared-auto/healthnews/cdc-/627135.html)

This flu is actually being caused by chemtrails.

The swine flu is a cover up for the increased spraying of drugs and chemical to cull the population and suck up all of our savings and wealth through the medical industry.

BlueAngel
05-16-2009, 10:07 PM
Welcome to AJC! | ajc.com (http://www.ajc.com/health/content/shared-auto/healthnews/cdc-/627135.html)

This flu is actually being caused by chem trails.

The swine flu is a cover up for the increased spraying of drugs and chemical to cull the population and suck up all of our savings and wealth through the medical industry.

Oh, please.

How is the Swine Flu going to suck up all of our savings and wealth through the medical industry?

We don't have any savings and/or wealth.

They've already been sucked up and the medical industry isn't to blame.

First, the Swine Flu was biologically created in a laboratory and now it's due to Chem trails.

Please explain to US how it is that CHEMTRAILS do not affect those who hold positions of power.

What?

Have they all been inoculated against the CHEMTRAIL virus?

If they're spraying something that is infectious, they don't pick and chose their victims.

It trickles down.

So, how is it that those who hold positions of power are immune to the affects of CHEMTRAILS?

Have they been inoculated against the CHEMTRAIL virus?

I've asked you to explain this before and you have not.

I don't expect that you will do so now.

stompk
05-17-2009, 07:54 AM
So, how is it that those who hold positions of power are immune to the affects of CHEMTRAILS?

Have they been inoculated against the CHEMTRAIL virus?

I've asked you to explain this before and you have not.

I don't expect that you will do so now.

They are spraying heavy metals such as silver iodide, barium, aluminum, lead and mercury.

The nanoparticles (dust size) of metals act as seeding agents in clouds.

One method to rid these heavy metal toxins from the body is Chelation.


Toxic metal molecules, such as aluminum and barium within the sprayed chemtrails, invade various cells and perform a "molecular mimicry." This mimicry involves displacing important mineral molecules in human cells and binding toxic molecules to those host cells. Eventually, a destructive process occurs on cellular and DNA levels. Because of that binding, a chelating agent is needed to remove those mimicking molecules

Protect Yourself from Poisons in the Sky (http://www.naturalnews.com/026258.html)

One of these chelating agents is called Zeolite.


Doctor Recommends Powerful Antiviral Against Swine Flu
PR Web (press release) - ‎Apr 29, 2009‎
Dr. Howard Peiper, a Pulitzer Prize nominated health and medical author, is recommending an antiviral product from ZEO Health Ltd. called Zeolite-AV to ...

zeolite - Google News (http://news.google.com/news?q=zeolite&sourceid=navclient-ff&rlz=1B2GGFB_enUS223&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=N&hl=en&tab=wn)

Of course, when you try to click the link above, the article has been removed.


MANY of our health problems are unknowingly caused by toxins and heavy metals continually building up and collecting in our bodies. Zeolite is a natural mineral which has a negative charge and molecular cage structure. This negative charge acts like a magnet to pull the toxins from your body and trap them into the zeolite’s cage, which then safely carries them out of the body as waste. Since your body is never exposed to the withdrawing toxins, there are virtually no side effects. Zeolite is safe and extremely effective.

Body Detox : Chelation : Detox Body : Zeolite : Diet Detox : ZEO Health (http://www.zeohealth.com/i/webmaster-1242568019/_/home.html)

A Google search of "zeo health swine flu" produces this
zeo health swine flu - Google Search (http://www.google.com/search?q=zeo+health+swine+flu&sourceid=navclient-ff&ie=UTF-8&rlz=1B2GGFB_enUS223)

Now, ask yourself, why would doctors be quietly suggesting Zeolite treatment for swine flu when it it primarily used to remove heavy metal toxins unless that is what the swine flu is actually being cause by. Chemtrails.

BlueAngel
05-18-2009, 09:24 PM
They are spraying heavy metals such as silver iodide, barium, aluminum, lead and mercury.

The nanoparticles (dust size) of metals act as seeding agents in clouds.

One method to rid these heavy metal toxins from the body is Chelation.


Protect Yourself from Poisons in the Sky (http://www.naturalnews.com/026258.html)

One of these chelating agents is called Zeolite.


zeolite - Google News (http://news.google.com/news?q=zeolite&sourceid=navclient-ff&rlz=1B2GGFB_enUS223&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=N&hl=en&tab=wn)

Of course, when you try to click the link above, the article has been removed.


Body Detox : Chelation : Detox Body : Zeolite : Diet Detox : ZEO Health (http://www.zeohealth.com/i/webmaster-1242568019/_/home.html)

A Google search of "zeo health swine flu" produces this
zeo health swine flu - Google Search (http://www.google.com/search?q=zeo+health+swine+flu&sourceid=navclient-ff&ie=UTF-8&rlz=1B2GGFB_enUS223)

Now, ask yourself, why would doctors be quietly suggesting Zeolite treatment for swine flu when it it primarily used to remove heavy metal toxins unless that is what the swine flu is actually being cause by. Chemtrails.

I asked you a specific question and this is your answer!?!

If figures.

I didn't expect you would be able to provide any insight, but would, instead, offer up a bunch of jibberish.

We don't speak JIBBERISH on this site.

Plain ENGLISH is our method of communication.

You might want to learn it.

stompk
05-19-2009, 06:25 AM
GENEVA (AFP) — The global tally of confirmed swine flu cases rose by 1,001 in a day to 9,830 in 40 countries, with 79 deaths, the World Health Organisation said on Tuesday.

http://i42.tinypic.com/1z4dclw.jpg
AFP: Global swine flu caseload rises to nearly 10,000 (http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/slideshow/ALeqM5hylODpf_M3cWMSVxKi4k6IlrS8nw?index=0&ned=us)

BlueAngel
05-22-2009, 09:50 PM
Excerpt:

Swine Flu Fears Traveling Faster Than The Virus

I'll say.

Gee.

I wonder why?

Excerpt:

"in case world health authorities decide that people indeed need to be vaccinated sometime next fall."

Huh?

This flu has proven, thus far, to be less fatal than the unnamed flu that humans contract during the winter season and mandatory vaccinations are not required, yet, world health authorities may DECIDE that people indeed need to be vaccinated against the Swine flu sometime next fall.

Again.

Huh?

Ex-CDC head recalls '76 swine flu outbreak - CNN.com (http://www.cnn.com/2009/HEALTH/04/30/swine.flu.1976/index.html#cnnSTCText)

Excerpt:

"Federal officials urged widespread vaccinations after swine flu broke out among soldiers at Fort Dix, New Jersey, killing one of the 14 diagnosed with the illness. But the program was suspended after at least 25 people died from vaccine reactions. Other estimates put the death toll at 32 people, while about 500 others later suffered from Guillain-Barre syndrome, which damages nerves and can lead to paralysis."

ATLANTA, Georgia (CNN) -- The man who led the response to the 1976 swine flu outbreak is defending the vaccination campaign that led to more deaths than the disease, but says he's sorry for the people killed or sickened.

Dr. David Sencer says with today's knowledge, officials' 1976 recommendations would have been different.

Federal officials urged widespread vaccinations after swine flu broke out among soldiers at Fort Dix, New Jersey, killing one of the 14 diagnosed with the illness. But the program was suspended after at least 25 people died from vaccine reactions. Other estimates put the death toll at 32 people, while about 500 others later suffered from Guillain-Barre syndrome, which damages nerves and can lead to paralysis.

The results cost Dr. David Sencer his job as director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He was fired in 1977, after 11 years on the job. Now 84 and retired, he said this week that health officials "acted on the best knowledge that we had and believed that we were doing the right thing."

But he added, "We know a lot more about viruses than we did then."

"If we were faced with what we had in 1976 today, where it was limited only to Fort Dix, we probably would not have recommended a universal vaccination until we saw spread outside of Fort Dix," he said.

In the aftermath, the government was criticized for pushing Americans to get unnecessary vaccinations. "But we also have to feel if we didn't do something and swine flu spread, more people would have died," Sencer said.

Asked about those hurt by the vaccine, he said, "If you're not sorry, you're not a human being." But he said the government paid settlements to those hurt, "So that we tried to make at least reparations in that standpoint."

Sencer said officials were worried about a pandemic on the scale of the 1918 flu outbreak that killed an estimated 21 million people worldwide. The vaccination campaign, which featured televised ads showing how an epidemic could spread rapidly, led to 43 million people receiving flu shots.

Then-President Gerald Ford was photographed receiving his shot, and Sencer said he took the vaccine.

The pictures of Ford getting vaccinated, Sencer said, injected a measure of politics into the situation that he said the Obama administration has so far avoided in its response to the current outbreak.

"I think we tried to stay out of the politics, and the politicians kept getting in our way," he said.

This time, he said, the government has let scientists and physicians take the lead in battling the H1N1 strain that emerged in Mexico in April and has been confirmed in at least nine other countries, according to the World Health Organization.

US moving closer to swine flu vaccine - Yahoo! News (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090522/ap_on_he_me/us_med_swine_flu_origins)

US moving closer to swine flu vaccine

Swine Flu Fears Traveling Faster Than The Virus

CBS 2 New York AP –

By LAURAN NEERGAARD, AP Medical Writer Lauran Neergaard

Fri May 22, 2009 6:15 pm ET

WASHINGTON – Inching closer to a swine flu vaccine, the government is beginning to analyze two candidates for the key ingredient to brew one.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention hopes to deliver one or both to vaccine manufacturers by the end of next week so scientists can begin the months-long process of producing shots.

Friday, the government set aside $1 billion for crucial testing of the first pilot doses and stockpiling of key vaccine ingredients — starting in case world health authorities decide that people indeed need to be vaccinated sometime next fall. The stockpile will allow for quick production of shots to protect health workers and other people at high-risk from flu.

Also on Friday, CDC scientists unveiled the most detailed genetic examination yet of the novel virus, finding that the new swine flu may have been circulating undetected in pigs for years.

That report, in the journal Science, still fails to solve the bigger mystery of when and where the virus made the jump to people and what genetic change allowed it to start spreading so rapidly. The virus was first detected last month, and at least 42 countries now have confirmed it in more than 11,000 people. At least 85 people have died from it.

The confirmed cases don't represent anywhere near the full scope of the outbreak: For every reported case of swine flu, there may be 20 people sickened with it, said CDC's Dr. Anne Schuchat — more than 100,000 people in the U.S. There are signs that it is declining in parts of the country, although school-related outbreaks in New York City and elsewhere have led to the closings of about 60 schools affecting 42,000 students, Schuchat said.

The candidate vaccine viruses the CDC has begun analyzing contain a mix of genes from the new swine flu virus itself with components of other viruses that allow them to grow better in the eggs that manufacturers use to produce vaccine. If one or both prove usable, manufacturers could begin producing pilot lots for testing this summer to see if the shots are safe, trigger immune protection and require one dose or two.

Influenza is a master of evolution, a quick-change artist that can rapidly swap genes to create new strains. Birds are the ultimate origin of influenza viruses, said CDC flu chief Nancy Cox, a senior author of the gene paper in Science.

But Type A flu viruses have long circulated in pigs, too, dating to when the infamous 1918 pandemic strain was introduced to swine. All three global flu epidemics of the past century passed on traits to ancestors of this new flu. Among those ancestors was a triple-strain, or "triple reassortant," as scientists call it — part pig, part bird, part human — that first hit U.S. pig farms in 1998. Others are traced to pig viruses in Europe and Asia.

In fact, viruses with genes that most resemble the new swine flu — known scientifically as part of the H1N1 influenza family — were identified 10 years ago. And a human case in Thailand in 2005 was found to share genes from both the North American and Eurasian swine flu lineages, but not in the exact never-before-seen genetic combination that this new flu contains, Cox said.

Pig populations around the world need to be more closely monitored for emerging influenza viruses, the CDC-led team concluded. The researchers have asked veterinarian colleagues around the world to check their freezers for samples from pigs or other animals that might help narrow down how the new flu made the species jump to people. It could have involved yet another intermediate animal host, Cox noted.

On the good side, the 51 virus samples from Mexico and the U.S. that the team analyzed were all very similar, in both their genetic characteristics and the way they interact with immune-system cells. That makes hunting a usable vaccine easier, Cox said.

___

On the Net:

Science: Science/AAAS | Scientific research, news and career information (http://www.sciencemag.org)

stompk
06-08-2009, 05:45 AM
According to the World Health Organization (WHO) and some local more up-to-date reports, the total number of confirmed human cases of swine flu A(H1N1) infection has exceeded 21,000, including 125 deaths in Mexico, USA, Canada, Chile and Costa Rica. If these figures are accurate, that would be 1 death per 168 cases.

Global Confirmed Swine Flu Cases Exceed 21,000, Including 125 Deaths (http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/152855.php)

Flu is still spreading. Anyone know anyone that has it?

BlueAngel
06-08-2009, 07:37 PM
Global Confirmed Swine Flu Cases Exceed 21,000, Including 125 Deaths (http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/152855.php)

Flu is still spreading. Anyone know anyone that has it?

How does your earlier prediction on this thread as to the spread/deaths of the Swine flu compare to these figures?

About as inaccurate as that BOGUS global chart you presented that listed the number of Swine flu deaths/infections around the world?

stompk
06-09-2009, 05:55 PM
How does your earlier prediction on this thread as to the spread/deaths of the Swine flu compare to these figures?

About as inaccurate as that BOGUS global chart you presented that listed the number of Swine flu deaths/infections around the world?

Sorry, I don't speak moron.

You, of course, have no concerns over this flu outbreak, because it hasn't affected you. If it were one of your family members dying from this, you would be all over it.

What does the bible say? Oh yeah, "it's easy to love your family" which means, you should not be such a selfish jackass. Those MKUltra folks messed you up, didn't they. You still serve their god.

BlueAngel
06-09-2009, 10:24 PM
Sorry, I don't speak moron.

You, of course, have no concerns over this flu outbreak, because it hasn't affected you. If it were one of your family members dying from this, you would be all over it.

What does the bible say? Oh yeah, "it's easy to love your family" which means, you should not be such a selfish jackass. Those MKUltra folks messed you up, didn't they. You still serve their god.

Sorry, but I don't see any evidence that this flu, thus far, is any more deadly than the normal flu.

You have no CLUE as to the sympathy and compassion I have for anyone, so spare me your selfish jackass label.

No.

The MKULTRA folks didn't mess me up.

They tried, but they failed.

I have never referred to the MKULTRA PIGS as folks, but as PIGS.

If you're comfortable classifying these sadistic human beings as FOLKS, I can only say it speaks volumes as to your character.

Perhaps they messed you up.

You accuse me of following their GOD; however, I am here to inform you that they do not follow a GOD.

If you refer to what they follow as a GOD, you have problems.

I serve my GOD.

Not your GOD and not THIER GOD.

Whatever that may be.

I don't SERVE THEM in any form or fashion.

I have made this as transparent as a piece of saran wrap.

If you can't see that, you're blind.

If there were compelling evidence that this flu were any more deadly than the normal flu; taking the path of a pandemic or manufactured in a lab, I might be all over it.

But, thus far, this has not been the case.

When and if it is, rest assured I will be all over it like a fly on you know what.

I've demonstrated my ability to that extent.

BlueAngel
06-09-2009, 10:55 PM
I'm not an ALARMIST nor do I have a desire to strike fear and/or panic in the readership of this site.

THIS IS WHAT THEY DO.

I don't do what THEY do.

After I have gathered and analyzed pertinent information regarding a particular subject matter, I apply critical thinking and deductive reasoning in order to form my opinion/conclusion.

What about you?

Do you do the same or do you follow in their footsteps?

stompk
06-10-2009, 06:06 AM
A sharp increase in swine flu cases in Australia may mean the infection has become a pandemic, the World Health Organization says.

BBC NEWS | Asia-Pacific | Australia flu 'may tip pandemic' (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/8092474.stm)

Something is different about this "flu".

BlueAngel
06-10-2009, 09:59 PM
BBC NEWS | Asia-Pacific | Australia flu 'may tip pandemic' (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/8092474.stm)

Excerpt:

"The virus has infected more than 26,500 people in 73 countries."

The world population figure is approximately 6,602,224,175.

Note to Stompk.

You should copy and paste the articles you post together with the link, when practical.

The links, many times, do not remain for eternity.

They become broken.

CC is somewhat like a library.

When a reader opens a thread and links are provided within the thread, if the link is broken and they cannot read the context, the thread becomes less relevant.

BlueAngel
06-10-2009, 11:04 PM
World Health Organization link that contains the number of confirmed Swine flu cases in each country and the number of deaths.

WHO | Influenza A(H1N1) - update 46 (http://www.who.int/csr/don/2009_06_10a/en/index.html)

141 Swine flu deaths.

106 of the deaths occurred in Mexico.

BlueAngel
06-10-2009, 11:15 PM
•1918 influenza pandemic caused at least 675,000 U.S. deaths and up to 50 million deaths worldwide

•1957 influenza pandemic caused at least 70,000 U.S. deaths and 1-2 million deaths worldwide

•1968 influenza pandemic caused about 34,000 U.S. deaths and 700,000 deaths worldwide

------------------------------------------------------------

Ah, hey, STOMPK can you tell US the names of the influenza pandemics that occurred in 1957 and 1968?

I don't know anyone who has contracted or died from the Swine flu at present, but my husband's grandfather lost two siblings to the 1918 pandemic.

BlueAngel
06-10-2009, 11:35 PM
The WHO has not declared a Swine flu pandemic.

They have declared a Swine flu PANDEMIC ALERT according to the following chart:

WHO | Current WHO phase of pandemic alert (http://www.who.int/csr/disease/avian_influenza/phase/en/)

A pandemic is described as the following:

(of a disease)

widespread over a whole country or large part of the world.

As I have inquired, out of the global population as I posted above, should 26,500 confirmed Swine flu cases, worldwide, be considered a PANDEMIC (widespread)?

The answer is NO.

The WHO has labeled the Swine flu as a Pandemic ALERT.

According to the WHO:

Phase 5 is characterized by human-to-human spread of the virus into at least two countries in one WHO region. While most countries will not be affected at this stage, the declaration of Phase 5 is a strong signal that a pandemic is imminent and that the time to finalize the organization, communication, and implementation of the planned mitigation measures is short.

How can the WHO declare in their Phase 5 PANDEMIC ALERT criteria that a PANDEMIC is imminent?

The Swine flu is not widespread, but the WHO predicts that it will be.

How do they know a Pandemic is imminent?

Do they have a crystal ball?

The WHO declares that this virus is spread via human to human contact which is criteria for the Swine flu to be categorized as a Pandemic Alert
number 5.

Isn't the seasonal virus/flu transferred via human to human contact?

Why is it not considered a Pandemic Alert?

What makes the Swine flu any different?

Does the WHO keep global records during the normal flu season as to the number of deaths and those who contracted the virus/flu and sound the PANDEMIC alert siren since it, too, is spread via human to human contact?

BlueAngel
06-11-2009, 01:00 AM
That took a minute or two, but I'm confident with the end result.

stompk
06-11-2009, 07:39 AM
Health officials from Scotland, Indonesia and Thailand said the agency would declare a swine flu pandemic — a global epidemic — on Thursday after a teleconference with leading flu experts. Officials at U.N. missions in Geneva also said they expected the imminent announcement of a pandemic.

WHO likely to declare first flu pandemic in 41 years - USATODAY.com (http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2009-06-11-swine-flu-pandemic_N.htm?csp=34)

Global Epidemic.

PS. Good chart on that link ;)

UPDATE:


The World Health Organization (WHO) has declared a global flu pandemic after holding an emergency meeting.

BBC NEWS | Health | WHO declares swine flu pandemic (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/8094655.stm)

BlueAngel
06-11-2009, 09:06 PM
Don't worry, it's just a pandemic - Yahoo! News (http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20090611/hl_afp/healthflupandemic)

By Richard Ingham – Thu Jun 11, 2:09 pm ET

PARIS (AFP) – Now it's official: We have a flu pandemic. But what does it mean?

For many, the term may be tinged with fear. It evokes folk memories of three influenza pandemics that erupted last century and claimed tens of millions of lives.

The worst was the 1918-19 "Spanish flu."

The greatest plague of the 20th century killed as many as 50 million people, particularly the young and healthy, who could be dispatched to their grave in just a few days, their ravaged lungs filled with blood.

But health experts are keen to defuse any "we're all going to die" reflex after the World Health Organisation (WHO) on Thursday announced a flu pandemic was underway.

For one thing, "pandemic" is only a technical term that indicates the geographical spread of a disease.

Despite its scary connotations, the word is no indication as to how contagious or lethal the disease is.

"Your can have serious pandemics, and you can have wimpy pandemics," notes Albert Osterhaus, a well known virologist at the University of Rotterdam in the Netherlands.

Nor does the term apply only to influenza: the world already has pandemics of AIDS and malaria.

Together, they kill around three million people a year and infect millions more. They may cause grief and fear, but not panic.

The reason is that these pandemics have been established for decades, which means people deem them quantifiable risks, rather than a new, apparently random and thus terrifying peril.

Adam Kamradt-Scott, research fellow at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine at the University of London, says keeping a sense of proportion is essential as the world confronts the new flu virus.

"Even in the worst-case scenario, if this turns out to be a particularly nasty strain with around 25 percent of the population affected, the bulk of people are going to recover and lead normal lives healthwise," Kamradt-Scott told AFP.

"There is a risk that some people could die, but ultimately the majority of people who contract it will recover. So people need to be cautious and take precautions, and act on scientific evidence and not panic."

How lethal the new flu is, or could become, is a question for virologists and epidemiologists -- specialists in analysing a pathogen's genetic ID and how it propagates.

Pandemic viruses are microbes that have acquired new genetic material while mixing in an animal host -- usually a pig, which is able to harbour bird, flu and swine viruses simultaneously -- and then leap the species barrier.

The new genes mean people have no immunity to the virus, as they have not been exposed to it before. And as the virus spreads among humans, the strain is likely to further mutate.

"After emerging into a population it may acquire sudden virulence," explained Patrick Berche, professor of microbiology at the Necker Hospital for Sick Children in Paris.

"Then, when more and more of the population build up immunity to it, the virus starts to lose its virulence."

The pandemics of so-called Asian flu in 1957-58 and of "Hong Kong" flu in 1968-69 killed up to four million people and around a million respectively, according to varying estimates.

Their case fatality rate was around 0.1 percent. By contrast, mortality for "Spanish flu" was 25 times higher -- "The Mother of All Pandemics" is how US virologists Jeffery Taubenberger and David Morens describe it.

By resurrecting the virus, recovered in scraps among frozen corpses in Alaska, and then testing it on lab animals, Taubenberger and colleagues found it had a unique combination of genes that caused the immune system to run amok.

There is a host of factors other than genes that determine the toll from a pandemic.

These include the speed at which it travels geographically, the proximity of people, the season (winter is more favourable to the virus than summer), and, of course, medical preparedness and precautions taken by individuals and governments.

What makes the world more vulnerable in 2009 as compared to 1918 is the advent of jet travel, which means a virus can travel continents in just hours, and a population that has surged from two billion to six billion.

"But the advantages are that we have antivirals and antibiotics," said Berche. "In 1918, many deaths were due to secondary bacterial pneumonia following viral infection."

"In developed countries, we're no longer in 1918," said Joseph Ajjar, an epidemiologist who is head of the French Society of Hospital Hygiene. "On the other hand, I fear the ones who will pay a heavy price are developing countries."

stompk
06-27-2009, 06:08 AM
Article Tools Sponsored By
By DONALD G. McNEIL Jr.
Published: June 26, 2009

Swine flu has infected more than a million Americans, federal health officials said Friday, and is infecting thousands more every week even though the annual flu season is well over.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/27/health/27flu.html

This is a two stage engineered bioattack.

BlueAngel
06-27-2009, 10:19 PM
127 Americans have died from the Swine flu and most have had underlying health problems.

How do they know that the Swine flu has infected more than a million Americans and is infecting thousands more each week?

Crystal ball?

Please explain how you know that the Swine flu is a two-staged engineered biological attack.

BlueAngel
06-27-2009, 10:41 PM
I guess I have to do your work for you, STOMPK.

U.S. Passes Million Swine Flu Cases, Officials Say

By DONALD G. McNEIL Jr.

Published: June 26, 2009

Times Topics: Swine Flu (AH1N1 Virus)Swine flu has infected more than a million Americans, federal health officials said Friday, and is infecting thousands more every week even though the annual flu season is well over.

That total of those who have already been infected is “just a ballpark figure,” said Dr. Anne Schuchat, director of respiratory diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, adding, “We know we’re not tracking every single one of them.”

Only a tiny fraction of those million cases have been tested, Dr. Schuchat said. The estimate is based on testing plus telephone surveys in New York City and several other locales where the new flu has hit hard.

A survey in New York City, she said, showed that almost 7 percent of those called had had flu symptoms during just three weeks in May when the flu was spreading rapidly through schools. If that percentage of the city has had it, then there have been more than 500,000 cases in the city alone, though most have been mild enough that doctors recommended nothing more than rest and fluids.

The flu has now spread to many areas of the country, Dr. Schuchat noted, and the C.D.C. has heard of outbreaks in 34 summer camps in 16 states.

About 3,000 Americans have been hospitalized, she said, and their median age is quite young, just 19. Of those, 127 have died.

The median age for deaths is somewhat higher, at 37, but that number is pushed up because while only a few elderly people catch the new flu, about 2 percent of them die as a result.

Of those who die, Dr. Schuchat said, about three-quarters have some underlying condition like morbid obesity, pregnancy, asthma, diabetes or immune system problems. Even those victims, she said, “tend to be relatively young, and I don’t think that they were thinking of themselves as ready to die.”

The new flu has now reached more than 100 countries, according to the World Health Organization. The world’s eyes are on the Southern Hemisphere, which is at the beginning of its winter, when flu spreads more rapidly. Australia, Chile and Argentina are seeing a fast spread of the virus, mostly among young people, while one of the usual seasonal flus, an H3N2, is also active.

Five American vaccine companies are working on a swine flu vaccine, Dr. Schuchat said. The C.D.C. has estimated that once the new vaccine is tested for both safety and effectiveness, no more than 60 million doses will be available by September. That means difficult decisions will have to be made about whom to give it to first.

BlueAngel
06-27-2009, 11:01 PM
Excerpt:

"That total of those who have already been infected is “just a ballpark figure,” said Dr. Anne Schuchat, director of respiratory diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, adding, “We know we’re not tracking every single one of them.”

"Only a tiny fraction of those million cases have been tested, Dr. Schuchat said. The estimate is based on testing plus telephone surveys in New York City and several other locales where the new flu has hit hard."

-------------------------------------------------------------------

The entire excerpt makes absolutely NO SENSE!

Read it for yourself.

It makes ABSOLUTELY NO SENSE WHATSOEVER!

BlueAngel
06-28-2009, 12:38 AM
A suggestion for the CDC.

Cease and desist from using the word "INFECTED" when referring to the Swine Flu.

People either CONTRACT the Swine Flu or they don't.

They don't become infected with it.

They either have it or they don't.

The CDC's ball park figure is that one million American people have been infected with the Swine flu.

Like I said.

Cease and desist from using the word INFECTED.

You have either CONTRACTED the Swine flu or you have not.

You don't become INFECTED with it.

One million people in America have contracted the Swine flu, or, as the CDC says, become INFECTED with it and this figure of one million people being INFECTED with the Swine flu is based upon telephone surveys and only a tiny fraction of those have been tested.

So, as far as the testing?

What are the numbers?

Cause we don't think you should be conducting telephone surveys and using this criteria as evidence that one million people have been INFECTED with the Swine Flu if testing has not been conducted.

Just a suggestion or two.

BlueAngel
07-02-2009, 08:32 PM
Study: New flu inefficient in attacking people - Yahoo! News (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090702/ap_on_he_me/us_med_swine_flu_research)

Study: New flu inefficient in attacking people

By RANDOLPH E. SCHMID, AP Science Writer – 44 mins ago

WASHINGTON – With swine flu continuing to spread around the world, researchers say they have found the reason it is — so far — more a series of local blazes than a wide-raging wildfire. The new virus, H1N1, has a protein on its surface that is not very efficient at binding with receptors in people's respiratory tracts, researchers at the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology report in Friday's edition of the journal Science.

"While the virus is able to bind human receptors, it clearly appears to be restricted," Ram Sasisekharan, lead author of the report, said in a statement.

But flu viruses are known to mutate rapidly, the research team noted, so this one must be watched closely in case it changes to become easier to spread.

Even if it doesn't mutate, it's causing plenty of illness here and abroad already — and vaccine makers are working "at full speed" to develop shots for use in the fall if the government deems it enough of a threat, Dr. Anthony Fauci, infectious disease director of the National Institutes of Health, said Thursday.

Within a few weeks, Fauci expects to receive the first test batches for government-led studies in volunteers to see if the vaccine triggers signs of immune protection, at what dose and is safe.

The results of those tests will help the U.S. government decide whether to distribute swine flu vaccine in the fall, how much, and whether children or others should be first to get it.

The government wants public input before it makes any decisions, Dr. Anne Schuchat of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention told a meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science on Thursday.

Good news: The swine flu virus circulating today "is molecularly strikingly similar" to the spring's first cases, making it likely that any vaccine could be "a perfect match," Fauci added.

Worldwide, more than 300 people have died and more than 70,000 cases have been confirmed, according to the World Health Organization, which last month officially declared the virus a pandemic.

It's currently flu season in the Southern Hemisphere, and viral spread in Argentina has prompted schools there to give students an early vacation. But swine flu hasn't abated in the Northern Hemisphere, unusual since influenza usually retreats from summer's high heat and humidity. Confirmed U.S. cases have reached nearly 34,000 — a fraction of the infected are tested — and deaths rose 34 percent in the past week to hit 170, the CDC said Thursday. England's health minister said Thursday that his country faces a projected 100,000 new swine flu cases a day by the end of August.

Also Thursday, Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said the U.S. will provide 420,000 treatment courses of the anti-viral medicine Tamiflu to the Pan-American Health Organization to help fight the flu in Latin America and the Caribbean. "All of us have a responsibility to help support one another in the face of this challenge," Sebelius said at a meeting of health ministers in Mexico.

Sasisekharan's paper, meanwhile, warned that the H1N1 strain might just need a single change or mutation to make it resistant to Tamiflu.

The researchers also noted that the new virus is more active in the gastrointestinal tract than seasonal flu, leading to intestinal distress and vomiting in about 40 percent of those infected.

The research was funded by the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology and the National Institutes of General Medical Sciences.

___

AP Medical Writer Lauran Neergaard contributed to this report.

BlueAngel
07-03-2009, 10:11 PM
Bump!

BlueAngel
07-05-2009, 09:21 PM
Bump!