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Old 09-13-2005, 07:51 PM
Mawashi Mawashi is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 64
Default Re: PM outlines tougher anti-terrorism laws

I'm an Aussie but have been living overseas for a few years. I've been watching the same BS going down with a lot of interest. I'm pretty disgusted with all the police state laws and proposed laws, and with that American guy being held as a "national security risk." What's happening to freedom of speech???

On the whole, I think you guys are right about Aussies being apathetic about the whole thing. And it makes me cringe when people go on about the nothing to hide crap. If they do indeed have nothing to hide, then they should be quite happy about anyone asking them deeply personal questions. This is the kind of attitude that paves the way for a national ID card and database system along the lines of the tyrannical screw-up Bliar's mob are planning. I had a letter published in Melbourne's Age a couple of months back warning about the dangers of such a system, but very little came of it, though I did have some positive comments from family and friends.

But it takes more than just a few nice comments to effect positive change and prevent Australia, and any other country for that matter, from slipping into the ever-tightening grip of the NWO.

We've just had a general election (erection?) here in Japan last weekend, with the Paddle Pop Lion Junichiro Koizumi getting back in a landslide. He was able to purge most of his opponents from his own party and has enough of a majority to override the upper house in any attempts to change the national constitution. Being one of Bush's pals in the war on commonsense, it will be woth watching very closely what he does. Koizumi got in because a large block of undecided urban voters liked his style and image, but didn't look to deeply into the man himself, who appears to be somewhat in the globalists' pocket. My blog entry http://soapbox.at.webry.info/200509/article_2.html
goes into a bit more background.

One point that concerns me is that in the next couple of years, probably 2007, the government will roll out new ID cards for foreigners, containing biometric data, name and address printed on the card and a few other things. To fight terror, of course. This after foreigners, mainly lifelong Koreans who cannot get Japanese citizenship, fought for many years to stop the government from fingerprinting every foreigner in Japan, regardless of whether they were born there.

My theory is that the govt is merely testing the system on foreigners before introducing a national ID scheme like the UK's. The Japanese in general are more apathetic sheep even than Aussies and Americans, so it shouldn't be too hard to foist such a system on them. And it won't even matter if the system doesn't work; the image of control is what's important. :-o
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