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Old 01-29-2005, 12:31 PM
55132 55132 is offline
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Default New film at Sundance called "The Protocols of Zion"


It like the powers that be are getting worried about all the info comun out. This is there propaganda machine to disacredit the aware.


(SECAUCUS, NJ, January 28, 2005) The Protocols of Zion, an appraisal of contemporary anti-Semitism from veteran documentarian Marc Levin, made its international debut at 2005 Sundance Film Festival. The 90-minute documentary, which will screen at the Berlin Film Festival on February 13 and subsequently be broadcast on HBO, was shot by cinematographer

Noting an alarming upsurge of anti-Semitic sentiment in the U.S. and around the world after 9/11, director/producer Levin took to the streets to measure the temperature of what Elie Wiesel calls "the oldest collective bigotry in history." Throwing himself into the eye of an existential storm, Levin polls a panoply of people to explore the notion that Jews are out for world domination--a theory propagated by “The Protocols of the Elders of Zion," a century-old tract that, despite being discredited as a libelous forgery, is still widely available. Levin talks with street prophets claiming Jews are accountable for 9/11; with the mastermind behind an Aryan separatist website; with Christian evangelicals, Kabbalist rabbis, rallying Palestinian American kids, Holocaust deniers and survivors, and parading peaceniks. With a healthy skepticism, Levin listens open-mindedly to all points of view but isn't above plunging into raucous debate from his position as a secular humanist Jew.

Levin is a pioneer in the art of merging fiction and nonfiction filmmaking. From his dramatic features such as Slam, which won the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance in 1998 and the Camera d'Or at Cannes, to his episodic television projects such as Street Time, which was produced by Columbia/Tristar for Showtime, to his documentaries such as Godfathers and Sons, part of the highly-regarded Martin Scorsese PBS series on the blues, Levin seamlessly combines narrative and vérité techniques in a filmmaking style entirely his own.

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