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Old 11-09-2009, 07:30 AM
Out of the Box Out of the Box is offline
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Default Re: Real Atlantis Story Suppressed?


A few other reviews of The Tao of Physics :

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"A brilliant best-seller. . . . Lucidly analyzes the tenets of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Taoism to show their striking parallels with the latest discoveries in cyclotrons."—New York Magazine
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"A pioneering book of real value and wide appeal."—Washington Post
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"Fritjof Capra, in The Tao of Physics , seeks . . . an integration of the mathematical world view of modern physics and the mystical visions of Buddha and Krishna. Where others have failed miserably in trying to unite these seemingly different world views, Capra, a high-energy theorist, has succeeded admirably. I strongly recommend the book to both layman and scientist."—V. N. Mansfield, Physics Today
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"I have been reading the book with amazement and the greatest interest, recommending it to everyone I meet, and as often as possible, in my lectures. I think [Capra has] done a magnificent and extremely important job."—Joseph Campbell
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Fritjof Capra's The Tao of Physics is a unique combination of inspiration and rationality, of spiritual vision and the spirit of scientific inquiry. Mystical poetry and scientific formulae easily meet, cross and merge into an organic whole in this book.
In Part one of the book Capra takes off from a turning point that modern new physics has arrived at, which is a recognition of consciousness. He proceeds to explore the various meeting points of modern scientific 'visions' with the ancient wisdom of Hinduism, Chinese thought, Zen and Buddhism in the second part. The final phase of the book easily shatters the age old dichotomy of matter and spirit promoted by Enlightenment thought and gives science a human face and spirituality a scientific explanation.
Capra effectively proves that a dichotomous view of the universe where spirit was seen outside the matter, more from a Newtonian angle, has led to insensitivity and exploitation at various levels of human life. To re-establish this contact, Capra's link is the Relativity Theory, which continue to inspire many a scientist even to this day. On reading these chapters in the last part of the book, the relativity theory and pages from the Yoga Vasishta or Yoga Sutras sound one and the same. The book reads like a formulaic transcription of the Yoga Sutras. But what makes the book different from an esoteric scientific treatise is that it speaks with a heart--in other words with a perfect balance between the left and right side of the brain. Conversely, Capra's style and language makes Modern Physics well within our reach and understanding.
The Tao of Physics is sheer experience. Capra also establishes that every invention in Science is like a Cosmic experience. The book in essence reveals the third eye of our scientific community. The book makes us wish if only our science text books in schools and colleges could provide us with this experience. —Sandhya Gopakumaran

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