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Old 04-12-2005, 10:33 AM
get_real get_real is offline
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Default ARE THEY WHO THEY SAY THEY ARE? And that is...?


Does anyone know or ever heard of AHEPA?
(Greek organization)

Someone told me that they are a Freemason-type organization.

Also, how about them Knights of Columbus????
Are they a mirror image of Freemasonry???

Can I trust the ELKS? I like their all-you-can eat spaghetti dinners, though!!

Someone once told me they all have the same thread running through them??

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Old 04-12-2005, 11:09 AM
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Yeoshua Yeoshua is offline
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Default Re: ARE THEY WHO THEY SAY THEY ARE? And that is...?

AHEPA, the worlds largest Greek-American organisation.

The American Hellenic Educational Progressive Association

http://www.ahepa.org

The Knights of Columbus - NOT affiliated to Templary or Freemasonry in any way

http://www.kofc.org

Please note in the crest, a hatchet bound by sticks..........

Which for the more attentive in the class is a symbol of?
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Old 04-12-2005, 03:32 PM
MasonTemplar MasonTemplar is offline
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Default Re: ARE THEY WHO THEY SAY THEY ARE? And that is...?

I'm a Knight of Columbus. It was Catholicism's attempt to do a couple of things. One, it was designed for women who became widows to be taken care of - as well as their children. In the upper east of the U.S., Catholic men - mostly Irish, made up a significant portion of the general workforce. This typically meant that they didn't have a lot of reserve funds on hand in the event of their death and the widow wasn't able to afford a traditional funeral or take care of herself and her children. It was founded in the late 1800's by Father Michael J. McGivney in Connecticut. By joining, a member knew that his family would receive some assistance in the event of his death - not much, but some. This was done by giving them a life insurance policy. To this day, a member can receive the standard policy, or they can purchase other policies through their Knights of Columbus financial representative. This gentleman will handle all of the financial matters for the widow for the funeral. In the event that the widow doesn't want to plan out the funeral, he would also help to oversee the arrangements. They would be a typical KofC service. A member is not required to take out a policy, and many don't.
Another reason was to create a sense of Catholic male comradery. Because men put so many long hours into their day, there wasn't a lot left for a social life. This comradery helped them establish some networking, too. It's no secret that Irish Catholics were hard pressed to find safe,decent jobs paying a livable wage when they first came over. Discrimination ran rampant by the WASP dominated northeast. That's why so many became cops - to go along with the stereotype. The networking along with the degree system is similar to masonry, but that's where the similarities end.
There are four degrees to the KCs - each one espousing a particular ideal; Unity, Charity, Fraternity, and Patriotism. I sometimes have a hard time with the fourth degree in that most of these guys are WWII old timers and they don't take kindly to young punks talking trash about the government. That's just because of the era in which they grew up.
There is an initiation, and an oath taken. But, that oath is to Jesus the Christ, not to each other. That, first and foremost, is the biggest difference between the two. The other difference is that the ideals are based on everything that is common Catholic knowledge. The only thing that's secret is how the initiation is performed and the meetings of the 3rd and 4th degree. I belong to one of the oldest councils in existence. One would have to go to the upper east of the U.S. to find one that's older. It is by far the oldest council in our state. I can tell you that our meetings are made up of planning funerals, charity drives, different designated acts of charity for needy individuals - usually someone who is very ill, has just lost a loved one, etc.
The major charity drive is the "Tootsie Roll Drive" for the mentally handicapped. This money goes to the planning and expenses of the Special Olympics and other institutions for the sole purpose of helping them and their families out. We get audited every year by a different independent firm each time and everything is accounted for - unlike the Shriners.
So that's pretty much it. About the only major impact we've had besides charity work is that the Pledge of Allegiance used to say "One nation, indivisible, with libery and justice for all." That changed back in the 50's when a strong KC lobby pushed for the words "under God" to be added.
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Old 04-12-2005, 04:02 PM
MasonTemplar MasonTemplar is offline
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Default Re: ARE THEY WHO THEY SAY THEY ARE? And that is...?

I meant "liberty." Sorry for the misspell.
One other thing that is kind of interesting. In the late 1800's and the early 1900's, my great grandfather was the Chief of Detectives of the Toronto Police Force (fits the Irish Catholic cop stereotype). He was offered the position of Chief of Police. There was one stipulation, though. In order for him to get the job, he was told he had to become a freemason. Since being initiated into freemasonry and taking a death oath to someone instead of God was looked down upon by the Catholic Church (and most Christian denominations are headed this way, too), he said "no" to the initiation. The job offer was rescinded. It is just an example of some of the things that prompted blue collar Catholic men to want to join the KCs.
I did it because I wanted to honor my father, grandfather, and great grandfather. Plus I like doing the charity stuff. It's fun.
FYI - contrary to what many people believe, it is still not condoned by the Catholic Church to be associated with freemasonry. What was released in 1983 was misinterpreted and corrected in 1998(I think it was that year - but I'd have to double check).
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Old 04-12-2005, 04:44 PM
get_real get_real is offline
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Default Re: ARE THEY WHO THEY SAY THEY ARE? And that is...?

Hello MT!

I've taken care of several elderly that were freemason, (and the womenfolk OES.)

However, a certain patient comes to mind.
He told me he was not a freemason, but a financial supporter. (???????????)
What is that about? He never went into it with me, and I didn't continue to ask. How we had stumbled upon the whole subject of freemasonry was some nik-naks he had in the china cabinet with the logo.
etc, etc, etc..................
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Old 04-12-2005, 08:46 PM
truebeliever truebeliever is offline
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Default Re: ARE THEY WHO THEY SAY THEY ARE? And that is...?

MT, does your organisation have a secret handshake or 'secret' attributes of any kind?
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Old 04-13-2005, 05:22 AM
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Yeoshua Yeoshua is offline
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Default Re: ARE THEY WHO THEY SAY THEY ARE? And that is...?

An axe bound by sticks a symbol known as a "Fasces".

Bear any resembelance to another word?

I'll give you a clue - Mussolini had it on his flag.

Zeljko, I think, has mentioned the fasces in Ecuador's arms - this is not surprising as the Latin American states, like the US itself, were very influenced by neo-classicalism for their national iconographies.
Fasces can also be found lurking behind the shield of the arms of Cuba, believe it or not, and as the national arms appear on the Presidential standard, Fidel Castro himself bears fasces!

I have been lead to believe that the term "Fascism" comes only indirectly from the Roman usage (though no doubt Mussolini was not adverse to asserting the link) and that it stems from the "fasci di combattimento" "combat squads" formed immedately after WW1 by disenchanted veterans which Mussolini organised into a national movement which swept him to power. I don't know if this is strictly correct though.

A fasces refers to a bundle of rods wrapped together with an axe. It was used during the Roman Empire.
In terms of modern political usage, I know of the following few examples (aside from the obvious case of Italy) :
During the time of Marshal Philippe Petain's rule, the symbol of his regime was a double-edged fasces. I am not sure what the Party symbol of Jacques Doriot's Parti Populaire Francais (PPF) was, but I believe that the PPF might have used this symbol as well. I am not sure if Sir Oswald Mosley's British Union of Fascists (BUF) used the fasces in its iconography. (I believe the BUF main symbol was a lightning flash).
I am unsure if the Italian flag and iconography was changed at all during the time of the Italian Social Republic (Salo Republic).

Benevolent Catholic Organisation......Even the very words are a contradiction in terms.

For those who don't believe, do a search on either "Fasces" or "Axe bound by sticks" in Google.

And you are correct MasonTemplar, Catholics still persecute Freemasons and KT's. The set of DOUBLECROSSING murdering, sanctimonious bastards.

While you're at it, do a search on the origins of the words "To DOUBLECROSS"
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