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  #21  
Old 12-27-2010, 11:50 AM
JBoy JBoy is offline
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Default Re: Police Chiefs, Internet Escort Sting and Mayan Calendar 2012


S.F. chief offers break to cops in trouble

Andrew Ross
12-9 2009

A backlog of disciplinary cases is forcing San Francisco Police Chief George Gascón to play "Let's Make a Deal" with errant cops - offering passes for offenses that under ordinary circumstances could get them fired.


The chief figures he has to do something, having inherited a mess when he came on the job in July in which some officers' disciplinary cases had lain dormant for years.

Allegations of serious infractions by officers, committed on or off duty, are supposed to be heard first by individual members of the Police Commission and then by the full panel.

The problem is that, according to city records, only three commissioners have heard any cases in the past year: David Onek, who spent 18 days in hearings; Petra DeJesus, three days; and Tom Mazzucco, two days.

The remaining three commissioners heard no cases at all.

Commission President Joe Marshall said there are three main reasons for that: Commissioners, who don't get paid to serve on the panel, don't have the time to hear cases; they don't have enough staff to help them; and they lack the ability to "get everyone to the table."

"We also haven't had a full complement of commissioners," Marshall said. "We're supposed to have seven. When someone leaves, it creates a big hole."

Granted, but in the past commissioners managed to find time to hear cases - they just don't seem to be able to now.

"And it is becoming progressively worse," said Gary Delagnes, head of the Police Officers Association.

There are 47 disciplinary cases pending before the commission, the oldest of which is a domestic violence allegation that goes all the way back to 2003.

In an effort to clean things up, Gascón has offered what he calls "pragmatic" deals for about 20 cops accused of first offenses - in some instances, offering short suspensions and retraining in return for guilty pleas.

The chief cut one such deal for a cop who had been accused of domestic violence. No criminal charges had been filed and the alleged victim wasn't available to testify, so Gascón allowed the officer to get off with a few days' suspension and time in an anger management class.

Gascón emphasized that he is offering such deals only to first-time offenders. Cops with a record of disciplinary problems don't get a break.

"I'm not really happy with the deals," Gascón said. "But when the dispensing of justice is not swift, it hurts both morale within the department and the credibility of the department with the public."

There's talk of putting together a City Charter amendment to change the police disciplinary system, but so far that's all it is - talk.


No foul: The Alameda County district attorney's office will not press a battery case against former Oakland Raiders tight end Jeremy Brigham, putting to rest charges that he assaulted county supervisor and fellow coach Scott Haggerty in a dispute over peewee football.

From the looks of things, both men are eager to put the matter in the past.

"It's my understanding that Mr. Haggerty doesn't wish to pursue criminal charges," said Deputy District Attorney Ronda Theisen.

For his part, Brigham said that although Haggerty's original version of the story made him "look like a monster," in truth there had been "no physical punching."

Haggerty, who wound up in a neck brace, had accused Brigham of attacking him after a practice for a Pleasanton football team of 10- to 12-year-old boys.

Brigham had fired Haggerty two days earlier as the assistant coach, and supposedly suspected him of leaking plays to an opposing team.

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  #22  
Old 12-27-2010, 11:54 AM
JBoy JBoy is offline
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Default Re: Police Chiefs, Internet Escort Sting and Mayan Calendar 2012

December 8, 2009 | 9:29 p.m.



Stephanie Lazarus, the Los Angeles Police Department detective accused of murdering the wife of a love interest, pined for the man and grew deeply upset when he did not return her affection, according to court testimony Tuesday.

Prosecutors allege that Lazarus, a 25-year LAPD veteran, beat and shot Sherri Rae Rasmussen to death in February 1986, three months after the woman married John Ruetten, whom Lazarus had dated shortly before.

Lazarus was arrested in June, 23 years after the killing, when cold-case detectives reopened the dormant investigation and linked her to the crime through DNA tests on saliva taken from a bite mark on the victim.

On the second day of Lazarus' preliminary hearing, prosecutors called the detective's friends and colleagues to testify about the apparent heartache she suffered over Ruetten's decision to marry Rasmussen.

The testimony included recollections by Michael Hargreaves, an LAPD officer and roommate, who told about the night in the fall of 1985 when Lazarus woke him up crying and upset that Ruetten had broken up with her and become engaged. And Jayme Weaver, a former LAPD officer who worked with Lazarus, described the day Lazarus showed her a set of lock-picking tools and told her she was boning up on how to use them.

The portrayal of Lazarus as a woman desperately in love was bolstered by excerpts from a journal she kept at the time that were read aloud in court. In one entry, she wrote about waiting for 30 minutes for Ruetten to emerge from a restaurant after spotting his car in a parking lot.

During questioning of one of the original investigators on the case, Lazarus' attorney focused on a bloody hand print left on a closet door in the Van Nuys town house where Rasmussen was slain.

He asked the detective whether police had tested a sample of the blood from the print. The detective said he did not recall.

Attorney Mark Overland did not pursue the line of questioning, but should the case go to trial, he is expected to raise the notion that the blood came not from Lazarus but from some unknown killer.
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  #23  
Old 12-27-2010, 12:02 PM
JBoy JBoy is offline
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Default Re: Police Chiefs, Internet Escort Sting and Mayan Calendar 2012

10,000 Child Porn Images Found On Ex-TSA Worker's Computer; Epidemic of TSA screeners' porn/pedophile


10,000 Child Porn Images Found On Ex-TSA Worker's Computer; Epidemic of TSA screeners' porn/pedophile - total_truth_sciences | Google Groups
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  #24  
Old 12-27-2010, 12:07 PM
JBoy JBoy is offline
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Default Re: Police Chiefs, Internet Escort Sting and Mayan Calendar 2012

Without the phone companies taxpayer funded FBI agents would be dead in the water. Just ask former Cincinnati Bell Telephone Supervisor Leonard Gates who placed illegal phone taps on Senator John Glenn's Hotel Room to everybody in between. The piece de resistance he did for Cincinnati FBI agents was to assist them in committing voter fraud, along with his co-worker Bob Draise. You can find out more by going here http://www.thelandesreport.com/Donsanto.htm and here http://74.125.93.132/search?q=cache:...&ct=clnk&gl=us

and here
Network America, center for Vote Fraud Investigation, fair and honest elections, and the Pro-Life Precinct Project Battling the Wire Tap Coverup.

I love how My San Diego co-enablers love their Verizon Service.

for the uneducated and the uneducable

Sprint manager: ‘Half’ of all police surveillance includes text messaging
http://rawstory.com/2009/12/sprint-m...ext-messaging/
By Stephen C. Webster
Saturday, December 5th, 2009

textingcellphonesmobile Sprint manager: Half of all police surveillance includes text messagingAccording to a graduate student's research into the spying policies of major U.S. telecommunications companies, at a recent security conference a Sprint surveillance manager told a group of onlookers that half of all police requests include the target's text messages.

Half of millions -- including some 8 million automated, web-based requests for GPS location, all in just over a year's time.

The revelation was made by Indiana University grad Christopher Soghoian, as part of his PhD dissertation published Dec. 1, 2009.

He attributes the stunning number to Paul Taylor, an Electronic Surveillance Manager with Sprint Nextel, who was speaking recently at the Washington, D.C. International Securities Systems conference, otherwise known as ISS World.

"Looking around at the name badges pinned to the suits milling around the refreshment area, it really was a who's who of the spies and those who enable their spying," he wrote. "Household name telecom companies and equipment vendors, US government agencies (both law enforcement and intel). Also present were representatives from foreign governments -- Columbia, Mexico, Algeria, and Nigeria, who, like many of the US government employees, spent quite a bit of time at the vendor booths, picking up free pens and coffee mugs while they learned about the latest and greatest surveillance products currently on the market."
Story continues below...

According to Soghoian, it was during the telecom service providers roundtable discussion that Taylor dropped the bombs.

"[M]y major concern is the volume of requests. We have a lot of things that are automated but that's just scratching the surface," he said in an audio recording that has since been removed due to alleged copyright violation. "One of the things, like with our GPS tool. We turned it on the web interface for law enforcement about one year ago last month, and we just passed 8 million requests. So there is no way on earth my team could have handled 8 million requests from law enforcement, just for GPS alone. So the tool has just really caught on fire with law enforcement."

"He’s talking about the wonderful automated backend Sprint runs for law enforcement, LSite, which allows investigators to rapidly retrieve information directly, without the burden of having to get a human being to respond to every specific request for data," added Julian Sanchez at the Cato Institute. "Rather, says Sprint, each of those 8 million requests represents a time when an FBI computer or agent pulled up a target’s location data using their portal or API. (I don’t think you can Tweet subpoenas yet.) For an investigation whose targets are under ongoing realtime surveillance over a period of weeks or months, that could very well add up to hundreds or thousands of requests for a few individuals. So those 8 million data requests, according to a Sprint representative in the comments, actually 'only' represent 'several thousand' discrete cases."

Taylor continued: "Two or three years ago, we probably had less than 10% of our requests including text messaging. Now, over half of all of our surveillance includes SMS messaging."

He added that his team, which handles all of Sprint's police requests, is 110 people strong.

"It's useful to keep in mind that, as Sprint spokesman Matt Sullivan [said], 'every wireless carrier has a team and a system' through which police can access GPS data," noted a follow-up report by Talking Points Memo. "Sprint is the company unlucky enough to find itself the focus of scrutiny, but it reportedly controls just 18% of the U.S. wireless market, making it the third largest carrier."

GPS location "likely outnumber[s] all other forms of surveillance request," Soghoian added.

Sprint has over 47 million customers in the U.S.
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  #25  
Old 12-27-2010, 01:32 PM
JBoy JBoy is offline
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Default Re: Police Chiefs, Internet Escort Sting and Mayan Calendar 2012

i got a feeling Munster would enjoy this:

Black eyes
March 2008
Black-Eyed Customer
by Nick Black-Eyed Customer - Your True Tales - March 2008 - Page 3
I am a grocery store employee in Lewisville, Texas. I work in the produce department, and an odd experience happened the other day. I was on the floor just making sure everything was stocked and clean, so I was walking around and I had noticed this man came around completely by himself. He was wearing regular clothes, nothing unusual about him really, so I continued on with what I was doing. He just kept walking around my department and kept looking around the store, like he was lost or something. One thing I noticed that was weird about him was the way he walked. He didn't walk with a normal stride, but in a way it was almost like a slow motion type walk, yet not as dramatic and obvious as you would picture such a walk. It's hard to explain, but it was just a weird, slow walk.
After noticing that, I continued to work. I had bent down to pick up some trash on the floor, and when I stood back up, he was a good 10 feet away, and he was staring straight at me. Completely motionless, we stood looking at each other. All of a sudden, his eyes turned completely black, no white parts or iris or anything -- just completely black -- but it only happened for a couple of seconds, just long enough for me to realize he was "different".
I made a puzzled face and broke eye contact with him and continued working, and he just went away. I don't know if he was a demon or what, but I do know it puzzled me and still does. I believe he was a demon or something, and was wanting to show me that they are out there and can be just like us.

what u think Jacob ?? u likey ?? i know u enjoy such from your subject...

Last edited by JBoy : 12-27-2010 at 01:35 PM.
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  #26  
Old 12-27-2010, 02:50 PM
JBoy JBoy is offline
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Default Re: Police Chiefs, Internet Escort Sting and Mayan Calendar 2012

FBI's techno-sleuths find evidence despite tricks
CommentsComment on this article
Dec 3, 2009

The FBI is celebrating a new honor for its high-tech Chicago Regional Computer Forensics Laboratory.

The laboratory, which handles 500 cases a year in northern Illinois, on Thursday received full accreditation from the American Society of Crime Laboratory Directors-Laboratory Accreditation.

The recognition puts it in the top level of such laboratories nationwide.

At the ceremony, the FBI indulged in a little boasting about the lab's accomplishments.

2nd read



Tainting Evidence:
Inside the Scandals at the FBI Crime Lab

by John F. Kelly and Phillip K. Wearne


http://www.crimemagazine.com/tainting_evidence.htm
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  #27  
Old 12-27-2010, 03:41 PM
JBoy JBoy is offline
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Default Re: Police Chiefs, Internet Escort Sting and Mayan Calendar 2012

Be gone for a few.. by cry baby 1 and 2.... were u all breast feed ??? lol !!!

go join the Air FORCE ????
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  #28  
Old 12-27-2010, 07:02 PM
JBoy JBoy is offline
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Default Re: Police Chiefs, Internet Escort Sting and Mayan Calendar 2012

About 1.75 years later we now have 1,730 threads about cops committing sex offenses out of 10,431 total threads in the news section, which is about 16.6%. There are sure a lot of cops out there committing sex offenses. Most of the stories appear to be offenses committed against children. Cops must like them young. Maybe they resist less, and are easily manipulated by someone they are taught to look up too. Sworn officers of the law committing a sex offense against someone in custody appears to be on the rise. The person might have to perform a sexual act to get out of some traffic infraction, or perform sexual acts if they are already incarcerated for the sexual gratification of those in charge of their welfare.

Keep in mind that this is only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to reporting sex offenses committed by sworn officers of the law. I am only scanning a limited amount of these stories online, and lots more are missed. Please help out an post stories along with pictures of these officers in the Law Enforcement Sex Offender thread. They need to be exposed for the safety of the children. More often then not, their information won't appear on the various offender registries because SOL's tend to be a protected class of citizens even when they commit a sex crime. People can come here instead to find their information; although, they won't have a current address.

Please write and tell your representatives in government that cops must not be a protected class. Some legislators are trying to pass bills into law that would protect SOL's information from being displayed online. Supposedly it is to protect the SOL's and their families. However equal protection of the law should apply to everyone, and cops shouldn't become a protected class when displaying information. Especially when SOL's are so eager to display information about you online if you have been convicted of a crime. In some cases, such as in Ohio, you don't even have to be convicted of the crime for your information to appear online.

Read about all the sex abuses in this forum
http://www.copwatch.net/forums/foru...?s=&forumid=108
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  #29  
Old 12-28-2010, 06:40 AM
JBoy JBoy is offline
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Default Re: Police Chiefs, Internet Escort Sting and Mayan Calendar 2012

Help Stop Masonic pedophlia.. call ur state rep..
EXPOSE>>>>>EXPOSE>>>>>
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