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  #2121  
Old 08-21-2007, 07:07 PM
BlueAngel BlueAngel is offline
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Default Re: MIND CONTROL AND THE MUSIC INDUSTRY


You're kidding, right?

You think page 15 on the "Unholy Bruce" thread won't open because he's creating much more traffic on the site since he arrived.

If you look at the number of registered users, guests, hidden, etc., you'll see it's about the same as before he registered.

NO DIFFERENCE!

These people say whatever comes into their minds.

Any story!

Bullshit artists just like Springsteen.

Was there a bulletin; front page news informing the world, most of whom could care less, that there was a FREAK at the BTX site impersonating Springsteen?

Come one. Come all. It's a question and answer session.

Now is the time to ask this FRAUD any and all things Bruce.

Whether it's Springsteen or not, it's still the time to ask this FRAUD everything you've always wanted to know cause he has all the answers.

Oh, yes, and half the world has flocked to BTX to ask him questions they've been dying to have answered.

No, not really. Just shallow questions by the usual 24/7/365 posters.

He doesn't seem to have attracted an newcomers.

Only in your world.

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  #2122  
Old 08-21-2007, 07:18 PM
BlueAngel BlueAngel is offline
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Default Re: MIND CONTROL AND THE MUSIC INDUSTRY

A poster comments about a suggestion that Dylan and Springsteen play together:

I would love a BOB/Bruce tour. It will never happen. The clash of fans would be the height of hilarity, though. The Bob fans are real serious, like disciples (no exaggeration) i have been to one of their get togethers...some of them take it to a level i did not think possible.
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  #2123  
Old 08-21-2007, 07:47 PM
BlueAngel BlueAngel is offline
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Default Re: MIND CONTROL AND THE MUSIC INDUSTRY

Well, the "Unholy Bruce" thread does have 6,000 plus views in only a few days.

I would suffice it to say that the publicity the "Unholy Bruce!" thread; Springsteen himself; and BTX as well, have received here at ClubConspiracy might be the reason that particular thread has had that number of hits and BTX, in general, is generating more traffic and onlookers!

-----------------------------------------------

It's called INFILTRATION by the way.

Gathering and delivering the information to your superiors.

It's not an easy job especially when a child. It was more frightening than words could ever describe.

It is being incarcerated in a world of HELL!

I had to trust MEN to protect me; help me escape them and in the "occult" world, men are evil.

These men and women of intelligence saved my life.

I was being "mind controlled," and I had to use every bit of consciousness to stay as connected as possible to REPORT to my superiors.

As I've said, when it was known by THEM as to my COVERT operations, I was considered a traitor and nearly left for brain dead.

Well, here I am and I will never be silent!

You see it all the time in cinema and television.

It's real.

It's called spying.

It's called being a government agent.

It's called being an operative.

It's called being trained when I was very young.

It's called outsmarting them.

It's called being as sly as a fox.

It's called not being one of THEM!

It's called being wiser than the serpeant.

It's called fighting for the right to be FREE!

Good Night,
BlueAngel
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  #2124  
Old 08-21-2007, 07:54 PM
BlueAngel BlueAngel is offline
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Default Re: MIND CONTROL AND THE MUSIC INDUSTRY

Someone is distressed over the album cover so a poster comforts him:

What Springsteen is doing with both title and cover art is called "throwing down the gauntlet."

Take a peek at some of Bruce's previous album covers a little more closely -- you may catch a clue. The River is the most obvious to review.

---------------------------------------------

Why don't you just tell him which album covers to take a peak at and clue him in on the clue he might catch.

Oh, yes, let's look at The River cover album and compare it to Magic and see if we can find some clues.

CLUES TO WHAT?????

Oh, the mystery!

Oh, the missing pieces to the puzzle!

If only his fans could find them.
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  #2125  
Old 08-21-2007, 07:56 PM
BlueAngel BlueAngel is offline
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Default Re: MIND CONTROL AND THE MUSIC INDUSTRY

Someone is distressed over the album cover so a poster comforts him:

What Springsteen is doing with both title and cover art is called "throwing down the gauntlet."

Take a peek at some of Bruce's previous album covers a little more closely -- you may catch a clue. The River is the most obvious to review.

---------------------------------------------

Why don't you just tell him which album covers to take a peak at and clue him in on the clue he might catch.

Oh, yes, let's look at The River cover album and compare it to Magic and see if we can find some clues.

CLUES TO WHAT?????

Oh, the mystery!

Oh, the missing pieces to the puzzle!

If only his fans could find them.
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  #2126  
Old 08-21-2007, 10:04 PM
Barbara Barbara is offline
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Default Re: MIND CONTROL AND THE MUSIC INDUSTRY

SCHIZOPHRENIA AND PSYCHOSIS

Schizophrenia is not a terribly common disease but it can be a serious and chronic one. Worldwide about 1 percent of the population is diagnosed with schizophrenia, and approximately 1.2% of Americans (3.2 million) have the disorder. About 1.5 million people will be diagnosed with schizophrenia this year around the world. In the United States, this means about 100,000 people will be diagnosed, which translates to 7.2 people per 1,000 or about 21,000 people within a city of 3 million who are likely to be suffering from schizophrenia.

Schizophrenia can affect people throughout the lifespan although new instances of the illness are most likely to occur in early adulthood. It is relatively rare for children and older adults to develop schizophrenia, but it does happen. More commonly the incidence (rate of diagnosis) of new cases of schizophrenia increases in the teen years, reaching a peak of vulnerability between the ages of 16 and 25 years. Men and women show different patterns of susceptibility for developing schizophrenia. Males reach a single peak of vulnerability for developing schizophrenia between the ages of 18 and 25 years. In contrast, female vulnerability peaks twice; first between 25 and 30 years, and then again around 40 years of age.

Course

The full onset of schizophrenia is typically preceded by a gradual 'prodromal' (pre-cursor) period where odd behaviors and experiences, such as anxiety, restlessness and hallucinations begin to occur, but not yet with their fullest force. There may be a gradual loss of reality. Many schizophrenia sufferers describe the onset of odd feelings, thoughts and perceptions a few months before anyone else can see visible evidence of them. It can be quite difficult to recognize schizophrenia during this early prodromal stage, particularly if it is a new diagnosis and has not occurred before for a given patient. Though the schizophrenic person may have been hearing criticizing voices and experiencing delusions for some time, these symptoms may not have been overwhelming or frightening enough to have caused them to break down and act in a bizarre manner. Patients experiencing these symptoms for the first time may be able to hide them for a while, but this becomes more difficult as the psychotic process sets in and their outer actions begin to reflect their inner perceptual distortions.

Schizophrenia is not generally recognized to be occurring until after truly odd and irrational behaviors are expressed during what is called a "psychotic break", or "first break". Though the schizophrenic person's internal experience during psychosis may be terrifying, it is the outward symptoms characteristic of the psychotic break that are noticed by family members and others: changes in self-care, sleeping or eating patterns, weakness, lack of energy, headaches, changes in school or work performance, strange sensations, and confused, strange, or bizarre thinking that gets expressed as bizarre behavior. Keep in mind, however, that the actual break with reality may occur prior to the time that people around the psychotic person have noticed that something is seriously wrong. The symptom-rich period following the psychotic break is sometimes called the 'active-phase' or, alternatively a period of 'florid' psychosis. The term florid means "flowering" and the term is a metaphorical usage denoting that the psychosis is the end result or goal of the schizophrenic illness, just as the bloom is the end result or goal of a flowering plant.

When schizophrenia does occur, it often becomes a chronic condition that continues throughout the remainder of life with varying degrees of intensity. The "first break" may be the last break if the case of schizophrenia is mild and if treatment is administered promptly and continued as directed by a psychiatrist (a medical doctor specializing in mental health issues). More typically, however, the first break leads to a pattern of varying periods of relative recovery (which are termed 'residual' phases) and periods of new active-phase psychosis that continue throughout the remainder of patients' lives.
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I hate it when they say, "He gave his life for his country." Nobody gives their life for anything. We steal the lives of these kids. We take it away from them. They don't die for the honor and glory of their country. We kill them."-- Admiral Gene LaRocque
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  #2127  
Old 08-21-2007, 10:12 PM
Barbara Barbara is offline
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Default Re: MIND CONTROL AND THE MUSIC INDUSTRY

Prognosis and Recovery Factors
CenterSite

Prognosis

There is no known cure for Schizophrenia. Fortunately, there are effective treatments that can reduce symptoms, decrease the likelihood that new episodes of psychosis will occur, shorten the duration of psychotic episodes, and in general, offer the majority of people suffering from schizophrenia the possibility of living more productive and satisfying lives. With the proper medications and supportive counseling, the ability of schizophrenic persons to live and function relatively well in society is excellent. The outlook for these patients is optimistic.

Ten years after initial diagnosis, approximately fifty percent of people diagnosed with schizophrenia are either noted to be completely recovered or improved to the point of being able to function independently. Twenty five percent are improved, but require a strong support network, and an additional fifteen percent remain unimproved and are typically hospitalized. Unfortunately, ten percent of the affected population sees no way out of their pain except through death and ends up committing suicide. Long-term statistics for thirty years after diagnosis are similar to the ten year mark, except that there are even more people who improve to become independent. However, there is also an increase in the number of suicides to fifteen percent. Over time, women appear to have a better chance at sustaining recovery from symptoms than do men.

It is an unfortunate fact that people with schizophrenia attempt suicide more frequently than do people in the general population. This may occur for many reasons, including fears and anxieties associated with psychosis or depression and hopeless feelings that may occur when it is realized that a serious, chronic and life-changing disease has occurred. It is always difficult to predict which people are serious suicide risks, and this is the case for the schizophrenic population as well.

While people in the general population talk about suicide from time to time, professional mental health help should be sought right away for people (schizophrenic or otherwise) who make a habit of discussing suicide, who express any sort of plan to commit suicide, who stockpile pills, tools (rope, razors) or weapons for the purpose of suicide or self-harm, or who act out a suicide or self-harm plan, however half-heartedly. The impulse to suicide is most always a temporary crisis that can be overcome with time and proper care. Given the right treatment, the chance for a reasonably balanced life is good.

Recovery Factors

The key to successful recovery is early diagnosis and treatment. In general, the earlier someone with schizophrenia is diagnosed and stabilized on an appropriate treatment regime, the better their chance of recovery. In light of this tendency, anyone who suspects that they (or someone they know) may have signs and symptoms consistent with schizophrenia should consult with a psychiatrist at their earliest possible convenience.

Multiple factors appear to influence prognosis (disease outcome) in schizophrenia. Family history of schizophrenia is relevant. If no one in the immediate biological family of first degree relatives has schizophrenia or a related condition, that is a good sign. Multiple relatives who share schizophrenia outcomes is a bad sign. Other good signs include good social and professional adjustment prior to the onset of symptoms, and awareness and insight of symptoms as signs of a problem (rather than just reaction to symptoms without insight); patients demonstrating both of these signs may sometimes recover completely.

Chances for recovery are improved if the disease comes on suddenly, as opposed to when it comes on slowly. The older one is at the onset of schizophrenia, the better. If schizophrenia is treated quickly and consistently (see above) with good response to treatment, the prognosis is usually very good. A short amount of time that people suffer with severe symptoms and a lack of symptoms reported during periods between severe psychotic episodes are also good indicators of recovery potential. A personal history or family history of mood disorders may help a person to move through a schizophrenic phase quickly because their primary condition may be some other affliction. Since schizophrenia is a brain disorder, a good outcome is predicted when the brain has a normal structure and function as indicated by a brain scan.
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I hate it when they say, "He gave his life for his country." Nobody gives their life for anything. We steal the lives of these kids. We take it away from them. They don't die for the honor and glory of their country. We kill them."-- Admiral Gene LaRocque
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  #2128  
Old 08-21-2007, 10:23 PM
Barbara Barbara is offline
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Default Re: MIND CONTROL AND THE MUSIC INDUSTRY

About False Memory Syndrome

Dr. John F. Kihlstrom, professor of psychology at Yale University, has suggested the following definition of False Memory Syndrome:

"a condition in which a person's identity and interpersonal relationships are centered around a memory of traumatic experience which is objectively false but in which the person strongly believes. Note that the syndrome is not characterized by false memories as such. We all have memories that are inaccurate. Rather, the syndrome may be diagnosed when the memory is so deeply ingrained that it orients the individual's entire personality and lifestyle, in turn disrupting all sorts of other adaptive behavior.

The analogy to personality disorder is intentional. False Memory Syndrome is especially destructive because the person assiduously avoids confrontation with any evidence that might challenge the memory.

Thus it takes on a life of its own, encapsulated and resistant to correction. The person may become so focused on memory that he or she may be effectively distracted from coping with the real problems in his or her life."
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I hate it when they say, "He gave his life for his country." Nobody gives their life for anything. We steal the lives of these kids. We take it away from them. They don't die for the honor and glory of their country. We kill them."-- Admiral Gene LaRocque
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  #2129  
Old 08-21-2007, 10:32 PM
Barbara Barbara is offline
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Default Re: MIND CONTROL AND THE MUSIC INDUSTRY

Section 1: What is Satanic Ritual Abuse?

More and more people -- mostly women -- are being treated for "Ritual Satanic Abuse" (or what has later become the more reasonable-sounding "Ritual Sexual Abuse.") This abuse is usually "discovered" while a woman is undergoing treatment for an eating disorder or chronic depression. It is always "discovered" by therapists who are fundamentalist Christians who believe in a so-called "World-wide Satanic conspiracy" where hundreds of thousands of people around the world engage in ritual murder for the Christian "Satan" god, often eating their victims to destroy the evidence.

Several books have been written about this genre of belief since it has a solid historic precedent. The claims that "Satanic Ritual Abuse" encompasses are equal to claims made in the decades and centuries past for so-called "outgroups" -- groups of individuals which may or may not even exist. Examples of special note are Jews, Gypsies, and the "Illuminati." Every believer has been utterly convinced they've got first-hand knowledge of the conspiracies and actions of these evil groups. Many honestly believe they've suffered under the hands of such outgroups and have been suppressing the memories of such abuse. (See these web pages folders for details concerning False Memory Syndrome.)

Here's where Fundamentalist therapists come in. Over the last three decades the United States has seen the rising phenomena of believers in SRA. So many outrageous claims were made without a shred of evidence to support them that government agencies have been prompted to perform investigations into the allegations and have produced research reports which indicate that SRA is an urban legend. (Ask Fredric Rice for the FBI's report on cult activities in the United States.)

Still the believers continue to believe, merely expanding the conspiracy to include the government agencies (such as the FBI) which find the allegations to be nonsense. Since no one can find any evidence to back-up their beliefs, they seek to manufacture evidence. Therapists who believe honestly enough are implanting false memories into their patients and, since the patient experience strong emotional responses to the suggestive leading therapists employ, they too start believing.

The infamous and most expensive court case in America's history was the McMartin Preschool fiasco. In that case there were allegations of "Satanic Ritual Abuse" levied against the McMartins even though no evidence for any abuse was ever found, leave alone abuse of a violent nature. In that case a mother who believed in the Christian "Satan" god and in the "World-wide Satanic Conspiracy" honestly thought her son had been ritually abuse by the McMartins and she found therapists, other parents, and lawyers who were willing to perpetuate the unfounded beliefs. (HBO even created a pseudo-docudrama depicting the McMartins, with the movie ending with the McMartins caught in the act performing "Satanic" rituals with children. Naturally HBO didn't name the McMartins by name yet the story line was a cut-and-paste from the media depiction's before the trials.)

Many SRA allegations where made about the Branch Davidians at Waco, Texas. Janet Reno is a firm believer in SRA and honestly thought that the Branch Davidians were ritually abusing children in their compound. Even though Child Protective Services had investigated the Davidians and their children routinely due to allegations made by ex-Davidians, Reno widened her SRA conspiracy beliefs to include CPS and dismissed the findings which denied the abuse. Later allegations of illegal weapons and drug manufacturing laboratories were made to try to make the public believe the attack on the Davidians was justified. If Reno didn't honestly believe in SRA, the Davidians would quite probably have been left alone -- as most cults are.

The victims are the patients who are on the receiving end of false memory implantation as well as the families which are destroyed to their core by the process which develops. Usually a daughter starts off by being told her father raped her ritualistically. Her eating disorder or chronic depression are said to be caused by the repression of those memories.

Under the guidance of the Fundamentalist therapist, the patient is led to broaden the scope of the "repressed memories." After the patient starts to honestly believe her father had raped her, she is led to believe that her father brought in others to his house to also rape her. When that belief is firmly implanted, the patient is invited to "visualize" the activities and "make them real." Only by "making these memories real" can the healing process begin.

The implanted memories become ever more bizarre and outrageous.

Even though most patients end up believing memories of being cut, beaten, broken, or forced to give birth to babies (which are then murdered) they find bizarre and outrageous excuses as to why there are no scars on their bodies and why examinations find many who claimed to have given birth a dozen times still have their hymen intact. They are told by their therapist that repressing memories also cause the scars to disappear and that repressing memories of having given birth will cause their physical virginity to "return." They are told of "Body Memories" which are used to pretend that the every-day aches, pains, and itching of life are the results of "Satanic" abuse. Thus every time a believer experiences a headache they acquire vindication of their beliefs.

You can imagine what this does to the family of the patient. In most cases the patient is told to break off all contact with the other members of the family (otherwise the lies the therapist has implanted will be discovered) and to "grow empowered" enough to eventually confront the family, accusing them of what the patient now firmly believes actually happened.

Anyone who suggests that the person is mistaken or that the therapist is engaged in a secret agenda is called a "perp" so that the voice of reason can be dismissed on the grounds that anyone who calls for a sane, rational examination is in on the conspiracy to suppress the truth. SRA self-support groups have formed around the United States and they are places where believers -- every one of them patients of therapists -- get together and vindicate each other's beliefs. Any so-called "invalidating" talk is not permitted and anyone who suggests the memories are implanted are ejected from the group.

All of this happens as the result of the religious beliefs of the therapist. No evidence has ever been found and the aspects of implanting false memories are becoming better understood. So much so in fact that the patients who bother to investigate the validity of the beliefs so implanted in them always find that the therapist has been lying to them -- however good their intentions. Because of the growing awareness, many victims of false memory implantation are starting to sue their previous therapists -- and every one of them have won. There is no defense for the deliberate implanting of memories. While it is true that often the implantation is not malicious, it is still inexcusable to manipulate innocent people to vindicate one's religious beliefs.
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I hate it when they say, "He gave his life for his country." Nobody gives their life for anything. We steal the lives of these kids. We take it away from them. They don't die for the honor and glory of their country. We kill them."-- Admiral Gene LaRocque
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  #2130  
Old 08-21-2007, 10:49 PM
Barbara Barbara is offline
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Default Re: MIND CONTROL AND THE MUSIC INDUSTRY

When Memory Has a Mind of It's Own
Submitted by on Tue, 2007-04-17 11:07.

* Biology 202

Our understanding of memory is one of the things that make us intrinsically human. Many organisms have memory processes, they learn, they adapt o their surroundings, but humans have the ability to change those functions, to control them. We can choose what we learn and what we don't, we can memorize information and in certain cases force ourselves to omit things from our memory. Our lives are completely based around this function - adults work in a job doing things they have learned to do, children learn in school about things from our past, stories of our past are passed down from generation to generation by memories. Even the basic processes of our bodies utilize systems that have their own type of memory - our bodies, even down to the smallest molecules, "know" what their purpose is (2). This stasis enables us to function at the high level that we do - all parts of the body working together to produce a living, breathing, functioning, and above all remembering organism. Our memory grounds each and every one of us, makes us unique. Every person has different experiences that make their self. It seems that in this sense our selves are dictated by what surrounds us, what inputs come in and how those inputs are automatically dealt with. The problem, it seems, is when the reality of memory can be altered, when memory seems to have a mind of its own.

On a basic level, the biology of memory begins with three separate processes. The first process, encoding, deals with the processing of visual, acoustic, and semantic inputs. Second, in the storage process, the brain takes this information and creates permanent or semi-permanent records of the encoded inputs. This is called the consolidation process and occurs when inputs are received and connections in the brain between neurons, called synapses, are strengthened. The final process, retrieval, refers to the process by which an organism can recall these stored memories either consciously or subconsciously when needed. In addition, there are two different of memory: short term and long term. Short-term memory occurs immediately after the input signals are received. These signals are stored only temporary in the hippocampus, and there for this type of information can only be stored for a short amount of time (7,1). The hippocampus then consolidates certain memories into long-term memories through a process called long-term potentiation (2). However, long-term memories are not stored in the hippocampus but in various parts of the brain depending on exactly what type of memory it is (7,2). Generally speaking there are two types of long-term memories that the brain deals with: explicit and implicit. An explicit memory involves a conscious recollection of a specific event at a specific point and place in time, and knowing that we know these things. Implicit memory deals with unconscious processes, such as learning or subtle details in experiences that you do not pick up on consciously (2).

But it is not always this simple: when memory mixes with fear the boundaries of control and reality blur. The memory consolidation process can be enhanced or limited by many factors. When the body is undergoing a stress reaction, hormones such as epinephrines, adrenaline, are released into the body which trigger the release of more stress hormones, also stimulating the amygdala which has access to many of the parts of the brain that facilitate memory (6). Fear instigates this stress reaction very well. When a person has a strong fear memory, it is usually hard to overcome that fear because it is so strongly engrained in the mind, especially if the incident occurred at childhood when the brain is still developing. The fear response itself is a neural pathway where visual inputs are transmitted through the thalamus and amygdala which allow the brain to make immediate "fight or flight" responses to the situation, and then other, more long-lasting inputs are being sent from the visual cortex to other parts of the brain that analyze, interpret, and store the information that is coming in (5). The brain is linking the sensory and auditory systems to the autonomic nervous system without any conscious knowledge. The brain is controlling how a person remembers something, and therefore controls their reality, all without the participation of the I-function.

Interestingly enough, this idea of extreme memory enhancement when pushed to the extreme can have the exact opposite effect: the brain actually represses memories. As mentioned before, when the brain processes experiences it creates both implicit and explicit memories. In cases with extreme emotional input, such as sexual abuse in children, some researchers believe that the brain can actually repress the ability to form explicit memories in an act of self-preservation in a dangerous environment (2). However, this does not include implicit memory - the mind can still process an experience and store it in long-term potentiation without the knowledge of the I-function. However, these memories are not completely behind locked doors. Since implicit memory often deals with sensory details of situations that the conscious mind passes over, exposure to any of these same inputs can cause such repressed memories to be restored into the explicit memory. For example, in a case of a person who repressed memory about being abused as a child, the memory returned years later when a friend jokingly placed their hands around the person's neck, immediately reinstating the memory of the long forgotten incident (4). This issue is under extreme debate and has come to be a large problem in recent decades is sexual harassment cases. Once the topic of repressed memories began being studies and treated as a legitimate form of testimony, similar cases being springing up all over the place. When people knew realized that perhaps they too could have long repressed memories, the problem arose that more and more people began tricking themselves into believing they had had an experience, repressed it, and then rediscovered it (4). If you believe something strongly enough, a memory can go from explicit to implicit and seem as real as any real memory one has. Neurologically, such a false memory and a genuine memory may look exactly the same at the neural level, so where is the distinction? Where is the line between reality and falsity?

When questioning who has control of our memory, the initial response is simple: we do. Our brains are our brains and we control them. If only it were so easy. As you delve further and further into the intricacies of memory, it gets more difficult to separate exactly what is making the executive decisions. An individual can control their explicit memories, but have no control of their implicit memories. They could control perhaps certain emotions they experience, but they cannot control any that are tied to autonomic nervous system responses. Once a memory has been consolidated, the brain has the ability to repress it, retrieve it, switch it from being implicit to explicit, or even create a memory that never existed. If nine different people are in a single room and frightened with a venomous snake, one can guarantee that they will all have completely unique experiences: one may have no fear response, one may have a fear response and create a stronger memory of the scene, one may be so traumatized that the memory is immediately repressed. Whose experience is more real? Who is experiencing the ultimate reality of the snake? What is controlling all of these unique responses? It seems that the brain is hardwired to do these things for us, without giving any clue to the I-function. The self is determined by forces it can't consciously control. Our memory has a mind of its own.
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I hate it when they say, "He gave his life for his country." Nobody gives their life for anything. We steal the lives of these kids. We take it away from them. They don't die for the honor and glory of their country. We kill them."-- Admiral Gene LaRocque
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