Go Back   Club Conspiracy Forums > Current events > Latest News
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read



Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #81  
Old 06-11-2009, 10:06 PM
BlueAngel BlueAngel is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 10,799
Default Re: New Flu Spreading Like Wildfire


Don't worry, it's just a pandemic - Yahoo! News

By Richard Ingham – Thu Jun 11, 2:09 pm ET

PARIS (AFP) – Now it's official: We have a flu pandemic. But what does it mean?

For many, the term may be tinged with fear. It evokes folk memories of three influenza pandemics that erupted last century and claimed tens of millions of lives.

The worst was the 1918-19 "Spanish flu."

The greatest plague of the 20th century killed as many as 50 million people, particularly the young and healthy, who could be dispatched to their grave in just a few days, their ravaged lungs filled with blood.

But health experts are keen to defuse any "we're all going to die" reflex after the World Health Organisation (WHO) on Thursday announced a flu pandemic was underway.

For one thing, "pandemic" is only a technical term that indicates the geographical spread of a disease.

Despite its scary connotations, the word is no indication as to how contagious or lethal the disease is.

"Your can have serious pandemics, and you can have wimpy pandemics," notes Albert Osterhaus, a well known virologist at the University of Rotterdam in the Netherlands.

Nor does the term apply only to influenza: the world already has pandemics of AIDS and malaria.

Together, they kill around three million people a year and infect millions more. They may cause grief and fear, but not panic.

The reason is that these pandemics have been established for decades, which means people deem them quantifiable risks, rather than a new, apparently random and thus terrifying peril.

Adam Kamradt-Scott, research fellow at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine at the University of London, says keeping a sense of proportion is essential as the world confronts the new flu virus.

"Even in the worst-case scenario, if this turns out to be a particularly nasty strain with around 25 percent of the population affected, the bulk of people are going to recover and lead normal lives healthwise," Kamradt-Scott told AFP.

"There is a risk that some people could die, but ultimately the majority of people who contract it will recover. So people need to be cautious and take precautions, and act on scientific evidence and not panic."

How lethal the new flu is, or could become, is a question for virologists and epidemiologists -- specialists in analysing a pathogen's genetic ID and how it propagates.

Pandemic viruses are microbes that have acquired new genetic material while mixing in an animal host -- usually a pig, which is able to harbour bird, flu and swine viruses simultaneously -- and then leap the species barrier.

The new genes mean people have no immunity to the virus, as they have not been exposed to it before. And as the virus spreads among humans, the strain is likely to further mutate.

"After emerging into a population it may acquire sudden virulence," explained Patrick Berche, professor of microbiology at the Necker Hospital for Sick Children in Paris.

"Then, when more and more of the population build up immunity to it, the virus starts to lose its virulence."

The pandemics of so-called Asian flu in 1957-58 and of "Hong Kong" flu in 1968-69 killed up to four million people and around a million respectively, according to varying estimates.

Their case fatality rate was around 0.1 percent. By contrast, mortality for "Spanish flu" was 25 times higher -- "The Mother of All Pandemics" is how US virologists Jeffery Taubenberger and David Morens describe it.

By resurrecting the virus, recovered in scraps among frozen corpses in Alaska, and then testing it on lab animals, Taubenberger and colleagues found it had a unique combination of genes that caused the immune system to run amok.

There is a host of factors other than genes that determine the toll from a pandemic.

These include the speed at which it travels geographically, the proximity of people, the season (winter is more favourable to the virus than summer), and, of course, medical preparedness and precautions taken by individuals and governments.

What makes the world more vulnerable in 2009 as compared to 1918 is the advent of jet travel, which means a virus can travel continents in just hours, and a population that has surged from two billion to six billion.

"But the advantages are that we have antivirals and antibiotics," said Berche. "In 1918, many deaths were due to secondary bacterial pneumonia following viral infection."

"In developed countries, we're no longer in 1918," said Joseph Ajjar, an epidemiologist who is head of the French Society of Hospital Hygiene. "On the other hand, I fear the ones who will pay a heavy price are developing countries."

Reply With Quote
  #82  
Old 06-27-2009, 07:08 AM
stompk's Avatar
stompk stompk is offline
I work for God
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: In the valley
Posts: 542
Default Swine Flu Cases in the U.S. Pass a Million, Officials Say

Quote:
Article Tools Sponsored By
By DONALD G. McNEIL Jr.
Published: June 26, 2009

Swine flu has infected more than a million Americans, federal health officials said Friday, and is infecting thousands more every week even though the annual flu season is well over.
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/27/health/27flu.html

This is a two stage engineered bioattack.
__________________
God controls death. Hope He never takes it away.
Reply With Quote
  #83  
Old 06-27-2009, 11:19 PM
BlueAngel BlueAngel is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 10,799
Default Re: New Flu Spreading Like Wildfire

127 Americans have died from the Swine flu and most have had underlying health problems.

How do they know that the Swine flu has infected more than a million Americans and is infecting thousands more each week?

Crystal ball?

Please explain how you know that the Swine flu is a two-staged engineered biological attack.

Last edited by BlueAngel : 06-27-2009 at 11:23 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #84  
Old 06-27-2009, 11:41 PM
BlueAngel BlueAngel is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 10,799
Default Re: New Flu Spreading Like Wildfire

I guess I have to do your work for you, STOMPK.

U.S. Passes Million Swine Flu Cases, Officials Say

By DONALD G. McNEIL Jr.

Published: June 26, 2009

Times Topics: Swine Flu (AH1N1 Virus)Swine flu has infected more than a million Americans, federal health officials said Friday, and is infecting thousands more every week even though the annual flu season is well over.

That total of those who have already been infected is “just a ballpark figure,” said Dr. Anne Schuchat, director of respiratory diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, adding, “We know we’re not tracking every single one of them.”

Only a tiny fraction of those million cases have been tested, Dr. Schuchat said. The estimate is based on testing plus telephone surveys in New York City and several other locales where the new flu has hit hard.

A survey in New York City, she said, showed that almost 7 percent of those called had had flu symptoms during just three weeks in May when the flu was spreading rapidly through schools. If that percentage of the city has had it, then there have been more than 500,000 cases in the city alone, though most have been mild enough that doctors recommended nothing more than rest and fluids.

The flu has now spread to many areas of the country, Dr. Schuchat noted, and the C.D.C. has heard of outbreaks in 34 summer camps in 16 states.

About 3,000 Americans have been hospitalized, she said, and their median age is quite young, just 19. Of those, 127 have died.

The median age for deaths is somewhat higher, at 37, but that number is pushed up because while only a few elderly people catch the new flu, about 2 percent of them die as a result.

Of those who die, Dr. Schuchat said, about three-quarters have some underlying condition like morbid obesity, pregnancy, asthma, diabetes or immune system problems. Even those victims, she said, “tend to be relatively young, and I don’t think that they were thinking of themselves as ready to die.”

The new flu has now reached more than 100 countries, according to the World Health Organization. The world’s eyes are on the Southern Hemisphere, which is at the beginning of its winter, when flu spreads more rapidly. Australia, Chile and Argentina are seeing a fast spread of the virus, mostly among young people, while one of the usual seasonal flus, an H3N2, is also active.

Five American vaccine companies are working on a swine flu vaccine, Dr. Schuchat said. The C.D.C. has estimated that once the new vaccine is tested for both safety and effectiveness, no more than 60 million doses will be available by September. That means difficult decisions will have to be made about whom to give it to first.
Reply With Quote
  #85  
Old 06-28-2009, 12:01 AM
BlueAngel BlueAngel is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 10,799
Default Re: New Flu Spreading Like Wildfire

Excerpt:

"That total of those who have already been infected is “just a ballpark figure,” said Dr. Anne Schuchat, director of respiratory diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, adding, “We know we’re not tracking every single one of them.”

"Only a tiny fraction of those million cases have been tested, Dr. Schuchat said. The estimate is based on testing plus telephone surveys in New York City and several other locales where the new flu has hit hard."

-------------------------------------------------------------------

The entire excerpt makes absolutely NO SENSE!

Read it for yourself.

It makes ABSOLUTELY NO SENSE WHATSOEVER!

Last edited by BlueAngel : 06-28-2009 at 09:24 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #86  
Old 06-28-2009, 01:38 AM
BlueAngel BlueAngel is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 10,799
Default Re: New Flu Spreading Like Wildfire

A suggestion for the CDC.

Cease and desist from using the word "INFECTED" when referring to the Swine Flu.

People either CONTRACT the Swine Flu or they don't.

They don't become infected with it.

They either have it or they don't.

The CDC's ball park figure is that one million American people have been infected with the Swine flu.

Like I said.

Cease and desist from using the word INFECTED.

You have either CONTRACTED the Swine flu or you have not.

You don't become INFECTED with it.

One million people in America have contracted the Swine flu, or, as the CDC says, become INFECTED with it and this figure of one million people being INFECTED with the Swine flu is based upon telephone surveys and only a tiny fraction of those have been tested.

So, as far as the testing?

What are the numbers?

Cause we don't think you should be conducting telephone surveys and using this criteria as evidence that one million people have been INFECTED with the Swine Flu if testing has not been conducted.

Just a suggestion or two.

Last edited by BlueAngel : 06-28-2009 at 09:09 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #87  
Old 07-02-2009, 09:32 PM
BlueAngel BlueAngel is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 10,799
Default Re: New Flu Spreading Like Wildfire

Study: New flu inefficient in attacking people - Yahoo! News

Study: New flu inefficient in attacking people

By RANDOLPH E. SCHMID, AP Science Writer – 44 mins ago

WASHINGTON – With swine flu continuing to spread around the world, researchers say they have found the reason it is — so far — more a series of local blazes than a wide-raging wildfire. The new virus, H1N1, has a protein on its surface that is not very efficient at binding with receptors in people's respiratory tracts, researchers at the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology report in Friday's edition of the journal Science.

"While the virus is able to bind human receptors, it clearly appears to be restricted," Ram Sasisekharan, lead author of the report, said in a statement.

But flu viruses are known to mutate rapidly, the research team noted, so this one must be watched closely in case it changes to become easier to spread.

Even if it doesn't mutate, it's causing plenty of illness here and abroad already — and vaccine makers are working "at full speed" to develop shots for use in the fall if the government deems it enough of a threat, Dr. Anthony Fauci, infectious disease director of the National Institutes of Health, said Thursday.

Within a few weeks, Fauci expects to receive the first test batches for government-led studies in volunteers to see if the vaccine triggers signs of immune protection, at what dose and is safe.

The results of those tests will help the U.S. government decide whether to distribute swine flu vaccine in the fall, how much, and whether children or others should be first to get it.

The government wants public input before it makes any decisions, Dr. Anne Schuchat of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention told a meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science on Thursday.

Good news: The swine flu virus circulating today "is molecularly strikingly similar" to the spring's first cases, making it likely that any vaccine could be "a perfect match," Fauci added.

Worldwide, more than 300 people have died and more than 70,000 cases have been confirmed, according to the World Health Organization, which last month officially declared the virus a pandemic.

It's currently flu season in the Southern Hemisphere, and viral spread in Argentina has prompted schools there to give students an early vacation. But swine flu hasn't abated in the Northern Hemisphere, unusual since influenza usually retreats from summer's high heat and humidity. Confirmed U.S. cases have reached nearly 34,000 — a fraction of the infected are tested — and deaths rose 34 percent in the past week to hit 170, the CDC said Thursday. England's health minister said Thursday that his country faces a projected 100,000 new swine flu cases a day by the end of August.

Also Thursday, Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said the U.S. will provide 420,000 treatment courses of the anti-viral medicine Tamiflu to the Pan-American Health Organization to help fight the flu in Latin America and the Caribbean. "All of us have a responsibility to help support one another in the face of this challenge," Sebelius said at a meeting of health ministers in Mexico.

Sasisekharan's paper, meanwhile, warned that the H1N1 strain might just need a single change or mutation to make it resistant to Tamiflu.

The researchers also noted that the new virus is more active in the gastrointestinal tract than seasonal flu, leading to intestinal distress and vomiting in about 40 percent of those infected.

The research was funded by the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology and the National Institutes of General Medical Sciences.

___

AP Medical Writer Lauran Neergaard contributed to this report.
Reply With Quote
  #88  
Old 07-03-2009, 11:11 PM
BlueAngel BlueAngel is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 10,799
Default Re: New Flu Spreading Like Wildfire

Bump!
Reply With Quote
  #89  
Old 07-05-2009, 10:21 PM
BlueAngel BlueAngel is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 10,799
Default Re: New Flu Spreading Like Wildfire

Bump!
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:43 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.12
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.